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Posts Tagged ‘Potatoes’

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

We’re kickin’ it old-school today, friends.  If there was one dish that would represent the Midwest (or are we called the North now?) hotdish would definitely win the title.  I think I do a respectable job of exposing my family to worldly cuisines, but to be honest I’m a product of North Dakota and Minnesota, so there’s something that I find so comforting in a good hearty, potato hotdish.  It’s a bit of nostalgia from my childhood, but it also just tastes so good.

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

Hotdish can be made from a variety of ingredients– pasta, rice, or potatoes are generally combined with vegetables and proteins and a sauce of some sort.  My favorite is this one made with potatoes.  It holds together so well and the leftovers are fantastic.  Pasta hotdish leftovers, as you can imagine, become a bit mushy.  But potato versions?  They just keep getting better.

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

The hamburger potato hotdish of my childhood isn’t exactly the version I’m sharing with you today.  My mom would make a version, probably like most of the other moms in the Midwest, using a couple cans of condensed soup.  You know the brand.  It was fine.  It was lovely.  I’m thankful that she made us delicious food.  Do I make my own hotdish using that can of condensed soup? You already know I don’t because I like to keep processed food to a minimum in my house.  Maybe I’m a bit of a control freak and I hate that I can’t control what’s going into that soup.  Maybe I hate that it has been setting on a shelf for weeks, months, or longer.  Maybe I hate preservatives.  Or maybe it’s just so easy to mix up my own– it takes just a few minutes and it tastes about 1,000x better?

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

My point is, with whole ingredients, this hotdish is sensational.  This is mid-winter Midwest food at it’s best.  We love the peas and carrot version that I’ve photographed here.  But another classic combination that we enjoy is fresh green beans and corn.  So good!  Also, give brussel sprouts a try, as well– amazing.  You can really modify this recipe to suit your family’s taste.  Try using sweet potatoes instead of white. The same goes for the mushroom sauce– use any type of flour that your prefer to thicken it.  Make it gluten-free, if that’s what you need.  As I’ve mentioned before, the leftovers are incredible.  If this is your first time embarking on a hotdish, I hope you enjoy this delicious and legendary dish.  Bon Appétit!

Hamburger Potato Hotdish | Relishing It

The Recipe: Hamburger Potato Hotdish

(serves 4-6)

2 pounds ground beef, preferably grass-fed
1/2 white onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
black pepper
6-8 medium-sized yukon gold potatoes, evenly sliced (don’t even bother peeling them)
2-3 large carrots, peeled and diced small
1 10-ounce bag frozen peas, no need to thaw
chopped fresh parsley, for serving

Mushroom Sauce:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 tablespoons flour (AP, White Whole Wheat, or Gluten-Free all work)
2 cups whole milk
1 cup finely chopped crimini mushrooms
1 teaspoon dried thyme or fresh
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary (don’t use dried– just omit if you don’t have any)
kosher salt and cracked black pepper, to taste

Preheat oven to 375°F.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, brown the ground beef. Drain the fat when finished. Add the onion, garlic, 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, and pepper and sauté for a couple of minutes until the vegetables become somewhat aromatic. Remove from heat.

In a small saucepan over medium heat melt the butter.  When melted, whisk in the flour. When it bubbles, slowly whisk in the milk, followed by the thyme, rosemary, and mushrooms. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Continue stirring while the entire mixture becomes hot and starts to form bubbles. It will be done when the sauce has thickened a bit, about 5-10 minutes.

Place the meat mixture in a casserole dish, roughly 11 x 8 x 2.  Then toss the carrots and peas evenly over the meat. Layer the sliced potatoes next until they reach top of the dish. You may need more or less potatoes depending upon the size of your dish. Place the casserole on a large baking sheet to catch any drips while it bakes. Slowly and evenly pour the mushroom sauce over the potatoes. You may want to gently tap the dish to coax the sauce down in between the potatoes.  It will settle in more as it bakes, so don’t worry. Cover with a lid or use a tented piece of foil. Bake for about 1 hour, but remove the lid when there are just 10 minutes left to bake. Test the doneness of the potatoes using a fork.  Bake longer if need be. Remove from oven and let rest for about 15 minutes before serving, or the juices will run everywhere. Sprinkle with fresh parsley. Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

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Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

Happy New Year, friends!  I hope your holidays were wonderful.  Ours certainly were, as we traveled back to North Dakota and were able to spend time with much of our family.  The older I get the more I cherish this time.  Things returned to normal this week with the kids going back to school.  I love the holiday season, and letting it go can be a little bit hard for me.  And so it goes.

Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

We came back to a much colder and whiter Minnesota than the one we left. In fact, the day we departed for ND, I was hustling about taking the recycling out with bare feet and wasn’t a bit bothered by it.  Wow, things have since changed.  We’re back to normal January weather with all of it’s wind chill glory (that’s sarcasm, folks). So, you can guess that I have warm comforting food on my mind.  Forget the New Year health fanatics with their cold smoothies and cold salads.  This girl needs warmth.  Don’t fret though, this is definitely health food– full of grass-fed beef and hearty vegetables.

Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

This beef bourguignon has been a favorite in our house for years and I’m only now getting around to sharing it with you.  The shame!  You’ll love it. It’s simple and full of earthy flavor.  Of course, there is a fair amount of red wine in it that works it’s magic with the beef.  Remember the homemade beef broth I posted somewhat recently?  You’ll definitely want to use that in this recipe.  And as for the wine, there is no need to spend a lot of money on a bottle.  A basic table wine will suffice, something somewhat dry. Something you’ll enjoy sipping on while you cook or when you eat, there will be a bit leftover.  As always, buy good quality grass-fed beef.  As with most stews, this one gets even better the next day, but chances are you won’t have any leftovers.  It’s delicious.  Hope you enjoy!

Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

The Recipe: Beef Bourguignon

(serves 4 or so)

olive oil

About 1 1/4 – 1 1/2 pounds of grass-fed beef stew meat, cut into bite-sized pieces

1/2 white onion, diced

5 garlic cloves, minced

1 quart homemade beef broth or purchased

2 cups dry red wine (table wine works well here)

2 cups water

1 large sprig fresh rosemary, chopped or 2 teaspoons dried

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 dried bay leaf

6 large carrots, peeled and cubed

7 medium yukon gold potatoes, cubed

1 1/2 tablespoons room temperature butter mixed with 1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (gluten-free flour can be substituted)

12 ounces frozen green peas

12-15 frozen pearl onions

2-3 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley, to garnish

salt and pepper, to taste

In a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed kettle, heat about 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat.  Sprinkle kosher salt and black pepper over the beef and add half of it to the hot pan.  Do not move it– let a nice dark golden color develop before flipping it over to brown the other sides.  Remove the caramelized meat from the pan and add the second batch, adding more olive oil if necessary.  When the second batch is done, remove that as well.

Add the diced onion and garlic to the hot pan.  Add a splash of beef broth if there are some darkened pieces that need some attention.  There is so much flavor in those pieces!  Continue to cook and stir  for a couple of minutes until the onion is somewhat softened, adding more broth if necessary.

Return the meat to the pan and add the remaining beef broth, red wine, water, rosemary, thyme, and bay leaf.  Add a bit of salt and pepper, too.  Bring to a near boil, then reduce the heat to a small simmer for about 2 hours.

When the beef is tender, add the potatoes and carrots to the pan and increase the heat to medium.  When the carrots and potatoes are fork tender, about 20-25 minutes, add the flour/butter mixture.  This will thicken the stew ever so slightly.  Gently, stir it in well.  Then add the peas and pearl onions and cook for another 3-5 minutes, or until the onions are warmed through.  Taste and adjust seasonings.  Don’t be scared to add more salt.  Serve with chopped fresh parsley.  Buttered crusty bread is a must with this meal. Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

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Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

I finally did the thing that’s been weighing on my mind for the last year.  I turned 40 years old on Tuesday.  My apprehension wasn’t about the number itself, or the accumulation of tiny wrinkles gathering under my eyes– it was heavier than that.  Those are superficial things that I can live with.  Instead, my dread has been a bit more existential.  Knowing that other inevitable changes are coming, like my children growing up, my parents aging, and that my limited time here is diminished with each passing year.  Those are the things that are harder to accept.

Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

But now that 40 has arrived, I’ve decided to do my best and be optimistic.  I’ll focus on the positives instead of dwelling on future loss.  I’m surrounded by  wonderful friends, and have been lucky enough to be born and married into two incredible families.  I get to spend every day with my best friend and love of 23 years, and we have two sweet children.  I’ve been fortunate with my health.  Right now, things are good by pretty much any standard.  I’m a lucky, lucky gal and I know it (and don’t think for one second that I didn’t knock on my wooden desk as I wrote that sentence).

Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

I’ve also decided to tackle new challenges.  My kids are at an age that I now have more time to pursue my own interests.  I’m ready to learn new things.  I want to take up pottery, learn to play the guitar and violin, to knit, and to read more.  I want to become more patient.  Mostly, I want to consciously be in the present, rather than always waiting for some vague future to just “happen”.   I also want to continue to learn new and exciting things about food and photography– this is the stuff that thrills me. Preparing the food, taking photos, and writing this blog make me very happy. I love connecting with all of you.

Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

With that little essay out of the way, there’s really no subtle segue into a recipe post, so I’ll just throw it out there– today I made simple, roasted smashed potatoes.  They’re kind of a hard one to name, but hopefully the photos help you out a bit. These little gems are all about texture, texture, texture!  Soft and pillowy on the inside and perfectly crispy on the outside.  I love to pick them up and snack on them, but they also pair well with a burger or steak.  Throw any herbs you fancy on them, but I particularly love the rosemary/preserved lemon combination.  So, so good!  Enjoy these potatoes over the weekend and thanks for listening to me ramble.

The Recipe: Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon

about 2 pounds of small yukon gold potatoes (halve or quarter larger ones)

1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary, plus fresh sprigs for serving

1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped preserved lemon

extra-virgin olive oil

good sea salt and freshly cracked pepper

Preheat oven to 400°F.  Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.  Set aside.

Begin by steaming the potatoes until they feel done when a knife is inserted into them– about 15-20 minutes (depending upon how big your potatoes are).  Remove from heat and continue to let sit in covered pan just to be certain they are fully cooked.

Dry the potatoes off if any water remains on them.  Then place them on the prepared baking sheet and gently smash them down with a fork.  You don’t want the potato to completely fall apart, but you do want some of the inside to be exposed– that way more crevices can become crisped.  Drizzle a few glugs of olive oil over the potatoes, then the chopped rosemary, salt, and pepper.  Roast for about 20-25 minutes, or until they have become a beautiful golden brown (check the bottoms, too).   Remove from oven and top with more olive oil, more rosemary, preserved lemon, and salt and pepper to taste.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

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Hearty Soup of Beef Roast, Root Vegetables, and Warm Spices | Relishing It

I’ve mentioned my rural roots here in previous posts, but for those of you that are new to Relishing It, I grew up on a small dairy farm in western North Dakota.  And I still get terribly homesick from time to time.  So this is one of those recipes that reminds me of my childhood, and helps me cope with being away.  It’s strange, even though I’ve spent more of my life away from Regent ND, it still has my heart.  It’s still my home.  One of the hardest parts of growing older is wanting those comforts of the past, but coming to terms with the fact that they’ll never again be as you remember them.  It’s the double-edge of nostalgia, I suppose.  I miss being that carefree kid running around the farm.  I miss seeing my childhood friends.  I miss regularly seeing my aunts, uncles, and cousins.  And I miss talking with my grandparents, who have all passed away.

Black Butte, North Dakota | Relishing It

                                                             My view every morning for 18 years

When I was a teenager, I worked at the museum in town during the summers.  On my lunch breaks I would venture up to my grandparents’ house for lunch.  My grandma would always make sure to have something ready for me and the three of us would eat together and talk about our lives.  Even then, I really did realize that it was a special time and that one day I’d look back on it with a mixture of longing and gratitude.  My grandparents (on both sides of the family) were real salt-of-the-earth people.  They were hard-working, no-nonsense, and very kind.  I’m so lucky to have had them in my life.  So many of my interests now are things that they did and were interested in– preserving, fermenting, gardening, sausage-making, and even distilling alcohol.  The conversations we could have!

Hearty Soup of Beef Roast, Root Vegetables, and Warm Spices | Relishing It

The soup I’m sharing with you today is based on a soup that my Grandma Jesch used to make for me on some of those lunch breaks.   I only have the memory of the flavors to go off of, but I think this is a pretty good representation.  She would often simmer an entire beef roast for hours, and then turn it into this most amazing, hearty soup.  It has chunks of tender beef, along with root vegetables.  But, the flavors I remember most are the warm spices.  There was a hint of something unusual that drew me to this soup whenever she made it– cinnamon, star anise, and allspice are what I figured they might be– and here they work beautifully.  Also, you’d be a fool not to finish this dish with a splash of cream.  Hope you enjoy!

Soup of Roast Beef, Root Vegetables, and Warm Spices | Relishing It

The Recipe: Hearty Soup of Roast Beef, Root Vegetables, and Warm Spices

(serves 4)

2 tablespoons olive oil

About a 3 pound beef roast ( preferably grass-fed and bone-in)

1/2 white onion, chopped

3-4 garlic cloves, chopped

1 quart beef broth, preferably homemade

4 cups water

5-6 large carrots, cut into chunks

3-4 parsnips, cut into chunks (if too large, remove the woody center)

3 celery stalks, cut into chunks

8-10 smallish yellow potatoes, cut into chunks

1 cinnamon stick

1 star anise

1/2 teaspoon ground allspice

1 teaspoon dried thyme (or 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh)

1 dried bay leaf

kosher salt, and fresh black pepper, to taste

fresh parsley and heavy cream, for serving

Heat a large Dutch oven with olive oil in it.  Season the beef with salt and pepper.  Sear all sides of it until a deep golden color develops.  Remove beef from the pan.  Add the onion and garlic to the hot pan and sauté for a few minutes until tender.  Add the beef back to the pan, along with the beef stock, water and the spices of cinnamon, star anise, allspice, thyme, and bay leaf.  Bring to a high simmer, then reduce heat to medium, cover and let simmer for about 2 1/2 hours or until the beef is somewhat tender.  Next, add the celery, carrots, and parsnips to the pot and simmer until the beef is fully tender, or practically falling off of the bone, another 30-45 minutes, or so.  Then, add the potato chunks and cook for about 20 more minutes until they are tender.  Meanwhile, remove the beef from the pot and separate it into chunks using a fork– removing any visible fat, as well.  Return the pieces of beef to the pot when the potatoes are completely done.  Re-season with salt and pepper.  Remove and discard the star anise, cinnamon stick, and bay leaf.  Sprinkle with freshly chopped parsley and a splash of cream before serving.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by today!

Laurie

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Paprikash.  Just saying it reminds me of being a little girl, coming in from playing in the snow to that amazing aroma of paprika wafting through our farmhouse.  My brother and cousins were there, of course, with the same frigid hands and red wind-blown cheeks.  This soup– more than any other meal– defined my childhood.  Paprikash is nourishing and delicious, but it’s so much more than that to me.  It’s family and friends.  Paprikash meant company was about to arrive, and that we kids had the freedom of the farm while the adults chatted the afternoon away.  It meant the comfort of having my parents, siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins all together to share a communal meal.  And now, paprikash is nostalgia.  It’s a bit strange to write about it here.  It’s bittersweet because I loved those days, and know that I can never have them back.  I’m reminded of how very lucky I was to grow up in rural North Dakota– to see my extended family every week.  This soup reminds me of those family traditions.  I love traditions.  I also love this soup.

This is my version of paprikash.  Like nearly every mother, grandmother, and aunt in my hometown, I’ve developed my own take on this Hungarian soup.  The foundations are the same:  beef, onions, potatoes, and dumplings.  And they’re all enveloped by a thick, rich, beef broth.  It’s a hearty soup that has a profoundly deep, comforting, flavor thanks to sweet paprika.  This is the bowl you want to eat when the snow is falling outside your dining room window.

Now for a few pointers.  First, use good paprika.  I can’t stress this enough.  The paprika is the canvas upon which the rest of the soup is created.  Buy the best you can.  Second, the soup takes a bit of patience.  The beef needs time to become tender.  When it’s ready, you will know.  And if you’ve never made egg dumplings before, they may seem a bit odd or confusing.  They are almost paste-like.  Here’s the thing though– just get them in there.  Drop a bite-size portion into the hot soup, they’ll cook, and turn out beautifully.  Finally, just how good this soup turns out will depend on the salt.  The amounts I list below should be fine, but remember that every beef broth is different.  Some are much saltier than others, so you’ll want to taste, taste, taste, as you add ingredients.  Better to add more salt later, than ruin an amazing meal.  I really hope you make this soup.  There’s nothing else like it.

The Recipe: Paprikash

(Serves 6)

5 tablespoons olive oil

1 1/4 -1 1/2 pounds of grass-fed beef stew meat, cut into small cubes

1 large onion, chopped (about 4 cups)

5 tablespoons sweet Hungarian paprika

2 quarts homemade or good quality beef broth

2 pounds yellow potatoes or yukon gold, peeled and cubed

6 eggs, lightly beaten

1 3/4 cup all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus a bit more.

cracked black pepper

3 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley, plus more for garnish

In a large Dutch-oven over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons of olive oil.  When it is hot, add the cubed beef and a sprinkle of salt and freshly cracked pepper.  Stir the meat a couple of times, and cook for about 5-6 minutes.  Transfer the beef, along with it’s juices, to a bowl and set aside.

In the same Dutch-oven over medium-high heat, add the remaining 3 tablespoons of olive oil.  When it is hot, add the 4 cups of chopped onion.  Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring often, until they become golden brown and are very fragrant.

Still on medium-high heat, add 5 tablespoons of paprika to the browned onions and toast for about 30 seconds.  Add 2 quarts of beef broth, the reserved cooked beef and juices, 1 teaspoon salt, and cracked black pepper.  Bring to a boil.   Reduce heat to simmer.  Simmer on low-medium for about 2 hours, or until the beef is very tender.

When the beef is tender, raise the temperature to medium and add the cubed potatoes.  Cook for about 10-15 minutes, or until the potatoes are cooked through and tender, but not falling apart.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, using a large spoon, mix the lightly beaten eggs with the flour and 1 teaspoon salt.  It will form a sticky paste.  This is normal.  When the potatoes are cooked through, begin to add the dumplings one at a time.  Using a small spoon, gently “plop” a bite-sized portion into the hot soup.  You may want to use another spoon (or your finger) to help you.  It will sink at first, and then float to the top.  Repeat until all of the egg/flour mixture is in the soup.  The soup will look crowded, and you will need to “push” some of the dumplings out of the way to make room for more.  Once they are all in the soup, let them cook for another 5-10 minutes.  At this point, taste the soup.  Much of the flavor is dependent on the amount of salt.  Add more if necessary.  Remove from the heat and stir in the parsley.  Enjoy with a piece of crusty bread.  Please note that this soup is even better the next day!

Thanks for stopping by.  I always look forward to hearing from you!  Come join SoupaPalooza at TidyMom and Dine and Dishsponsored by KitchenAidRed Star Yeast and Le Creuset 

Laurie

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So how much Halloween candy have you been sneaking this week?  Me?  Far too much.  Though I love how worked-up my little ones get about trick-or-treating, when I take stock of how much candy I have eaten I feel more than a little guilt.  That’s why there’s no better time to eat a nice, light dinner of…dried beans and cabbage.  I know, I know.  It doesn’t sound too tantalizing, but take a look at this dish.  It’s so satisfying.  I love cooking with dried beans.  If I can convince you of anything (aside from the benefits of eating organic, local, and unprocessed foods), its to use more dried beans in meals.  They’re inexpensive, and their taste and texture is so much more appealing than canned versions.  The only drawback is that using them requires just a bit of planning.  But even this isn’t difficult, as cooked beans can be stored in the freezer and thawed for whenever you need them.

Cabbage is another of those ‘lost’ ingredients that often goes unappreciated.  I love it’s versatility– it works in salads, soups, and main dishes.  Cabbage has that nice crunch when you want it, or you can rely on it for a softer, underlying texture.  And that mellow, slightly sweet flavor works well is so many dishes.  For this meal, I’ve also turned to the amazing smoky, saltiness of bacon, though it’s not necessary.  The flavorful beans and cabbage are powerful enough to stand up on their own here.  I make it both ways, depending upon my mood.  This is a simple, healthy, and most importantly, delicious dish.  Make it this week– it’ll become one of your everyday light meals, too.

The Recipe:  Cabbage, White Beans, and Bacon

(serves 4)

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

2 smallish yellow potatoes, unpeeled, cut into cubes

1/2 medium onion, diced

2 cups cooked and cooled white beans (roughly 1 cup dry)  OR 1 15-ounce can, rinsed and drained

3 cups finely shredded green cabbage

1 garlic clove

1/2 pound bacon, cooked and crumbled  (use more or less to your liking)

freshly grated parmesan or grana padano cheese, for sprinkling

sea salt and cracked pepper, to taste

In a large skillet, cook the bacon over medium heat until your desired crispiness.  Remove from pan.  Crumble when cool.  Begin to cook the potatoes next.  For more flavor, cook them in the bacon grease — or for a healthier version, drain the grease and add the olive oil.  Season potatoes with salt and pepper and cook over medium-high heat.  Cover and cook until the potatoes are cooked all the way through, 5-8 minutes.  Be sure to stir a couple of times, so all sides become golden brown.

Next, stir in the onion, garlic, and beans.  Try to cook each side of the beans, so they brown a bit, as well.  When the beans have developed some color and are a bit crispy, stir in the cabbage and cook for another minute, or until the cabbage begins to wilt a bit.  Stir in the bacon.  Season with salt and pepper, if necessary.  Sprinkle with a bit of cheese.  Enjoy!

Source:  Adapted from Heidi Swanson’s Super Natural Every Day

Hope you all have a fun Halloween evening — my kiddos are super excited to go trick-or-treating!  Thanks for stopping by today.

Laurie

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