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Posts Tagged ‘Rosemary’

Braised Beef Roast with Red Wine and Rosemary | Relishing It

Today I’m sharing one of my favorite beef roast recipes that somehow has not found it’s way onto the blog already.  And that is a pity, because it’s one of my go-to roast recipes.  There are so many wonderful things to love about this dish.  Let me start by saying that this recipe (like most recipes) can be braised in a Dutch oven or a slow cooker.  I generally make it on the oven, but have on occasion made it in a slow cooker.  Both versions are incredibly delicious.  So, depending upon your needs, you have the option to cook it however you like.  This dish is also a perfect make-a-day-ahead dish, as it reheats beautifully and the flavors get even better the next day.

Braised Beef Roast with Red Wine and Rosemary | Relishing It

There are a wonderful array of flavors that are combined with this roast.  I’m guessing you are figuring out that I love the combination of red wine and rosemary together since one of my recent posts also featured these flavors.  I can’t help it, they are perfect with beef.  I chop up carrots, celery, onion, and garlic into very small pieces that break down into a wonderful, delicious sauce. Fresh rosemary and thyme and a bay leaf are added to the vegetables, along with the red wine and a dab of tomato paste.  Left to braise for just a few hours in the oven, or all day in the slow-cooker, the beef becomes tender and you are left with a very rich and flavorful sauce.  The next step is up to you– there are a few options.  When the roast is done cooking, remove it from the pan.  At this point you can purée the sauce if you don’t want tiny bits of vegetables, or reduce it if you want it thicker.  However, here’s what I do.  I combine a bit of butter and a bit of flour (equal parts) with a fork until they form a paste.  I whisk that into the sauce, to thicken it just slightly.  And that’s it.  I don’t strain or purée it, because I really enjoy the chunky texture of the cooked down vegetables.  I re-season with salt and pepper and add some fresh parsley to brighten it up.  We love this meal.  Truly, it’s one of our favorites.  The red wine need not be expensive, something dry works well.  And as always, something you’ll want to drink, because there will be a bit leftover.

Braised Beef Roast with Red Wine and Rosemary | Relishing It

Along with braising some beautiful dishes this winter, I’ve taken up sourdough bread-baking using wild yeast.  This has been so fun and exhilarating.  I absolutely love to learn new techniques in the kitchen.  Back in the day before commercial yeast existed, this is how people had to make their bread –capturing and manipulating wild yeast spores that were in the air, on the flour, and even on their skin.  It is all very fascinating to me.  A lot of observing has gone into this process.  Being able to know when my starter is ready to be used or when it is hungry and needs to be fed.  Dealing with a cold, Minnesota house and predicting how long it will take my dough to get to the point where it is ready to be baked.  I’ve enjoyed the process and we all have enjoyed the bread.  And now it’s become part of our routine.

Braised Beef Roast with Red Wine and Rosemary | Relishing It

I hope you make this beef roast and either bake up some warm crusty bread or buy yourself a loaf, because that sauce will be begging for some.  Enjoy!

Braised Beef Roast with Red Wine and Rosemary | Relishing It

The Recipe: Braised Beef Roast with Red Wine and Rosemary

2 tablespoons olive oil

3-6 pound beef roast, preferably grass-fed (no need for an expensive cut)

1 medium white onion, finely chopped

5-6 garlic cloves, finely chopped

3 large carrots, peeled and finely chopped

2 celery stalks, finely chopped

4-5 fresh rosemary sprigs (either left whole or leaves removes and minced)

small bunch of fresh thyme (either left whole or leaves removed and minced)

1 dried bay leaf

2 tablespoons double-concentrated tomato paste

2 cups red wine

2 cups water

1 1/2 – 2 tablespoons softened butter

1 1/2 – 2 tablespoons flour

fresh parsley, for serving

Slow-Cooker Method: I’m not going to list cooking times in this recipe.  Most everyone’s slow-cooker cooks at a different rate and the size of your beef will effect the amount of time needed, as well. If cooking entirely on low– I’d give yourself 12 hours or so.  You may want to do a combination of slow/high temperatures, if wanting to shorten the length of time.  Dry off the beef and season liberally with salt and pepper.  In a deep pan, such as a dutch oven, add some olive oil and when the pan is hot, brown all the sides of the beef.  You want a deep caramel color.  Remove the beef from the pan and place it into the slow-cooker. Add the vegetables and a bit more olive oil to the hot pan. Cook just a few minutes until softened a bit. Then add the tomato paste, red wine, and water and bring to a boil, scraping up anything on the bottom of the pan.  Pour it over the beef in the slow-cooker and cook either on high or low, or whatever works best when cooking meat in your slow-cooker.  Add the rosemary, thyme, (they can be left whole, just remove the stems before serving, or remove leaves and mince, if you don’t enjoy large rosemary leaves) bay leaf, and a bit of salt and pepper. The beef is done when it is very tender and can be easily maneuvered with a fork. If it doesn’t feel tender, leave it a bit longer.

Dutch Oven Method:  Preheat oven to 325°F.  Add the olive oil to the pan and heat.  Dry off the beef and season liberally with salt and pepper.  Brown all the sides until it reaches a deep caramel color.  Remove beef from pan.  Add more olive oil, if necessary and sauté the vegetables for a few minutes until softened.  Add the tomato paste, red wine, and water and bring to a boil, scraping up any bits on the bottom of the pan.  Place the beef back into the Dutch oven, along with the rosemary, thyme (they can be left whole, just remove stems before serving, or remove leaves and mince, if you don’t like large rosemary leaves) bay leaf and a bit of salt and pepper. Cooking time will vary depending upon how big of a piece of beef you braise.  Begin checking at 2 hours for a smaller one, larger ones will take around 2 1/2 – 3 hours, or more.  The beef will be done when it is very tender and can be maneuvered easily with a fork.  If it doesn’t feel tender, braise it longer.

Before serving for both methods:  remove the beef and scrape off any visible fat.  You may reduce the sauce if you want, or purée it.  I don’t.  Remove and discard the bay leaf and any rosemary or thyme stems (if there are any) from the pan.  In a small bowl, combine the butter and flour with a fork until a paste forms and whisk it into the liquid over medium-high heat on the stovetop.  If using the slow-cooker method, it is a good idea to transfer the sauce to a pan and place on the stovetop when adding the butter/flour mixture over medium-high heat.  Re-season with salt and pepper (sometimes a lot of salt is needed to bring out the flavor, but don’t worry– it’s a big piece of beef) and add fresh parsley before serving.  This roast goes beautifully with regular mashed potatoes or a potato mash combined with parsnips or celery root.  One more note, this is a perfect make-a-day-ahead meal, as the flavors get even better after sitting overnight. Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

 

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Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

Happy New Year, friends!  I hope your holidays were wonderful.  Ours certainly were, as we traveled back to North Dakota and were able to spend time with much of our family.  The older I get the more I cherish this time.  Things returned to normal this week with the kids going back to school.  I love the holiday season, and letting it go can be a little bit hard for me.  And so it goes.

Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

We came back to a much colder and whiter Minnesota than the one we left. In fact, the day we departed for ND, I was hustling about taking the recycling out with bare feet and wasn’t a bit bothered by it.  Wow, things have since changed.  We’re back to normal January weather with all of it’s wind chill glory (that’s sarcasm, folks). So, you can guess that I have warm comforting food on my mind.  Forget the New Year health fanatics with their cold smoothies and cold salads.  This girl needs warmth.  Don’t fret though, this is definitely health food– full of grass-fed beef and hearty vegetables.

Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

This beef bourguignon has been a favorite in our house for years and I’m only now getting around to sharing it with you.  The shame!  You’ll love it. It’s simple and full of earthy flavor.  Of course, there is a fair amount of red wine in it that works it’s magic with the beef.  Remember the homemade beef broth I posted somewhat recently?  You’ll definitely want to use that in this recipe.  And as for the wine, there is no need to spend a lot of money on a bottle.  A basic table wine will suffice, something somewhat dry. Something you’ll enjoy sipping on while you cook or when you eat, there will be a bit leftover.  As always, buy good quality grass-fed beef.  As with most stews, this one gets even better the next day, but chances are you won’t have any leftovers.  It’s delicious.  Hope you enjoy!

Beef Bourguignon | Relishing It

The Recipe: Beef Bourguignon

(serves 4 or so)

olive oil

About 1 1/4 – 1 1/2 pounds of grass-fed beef stew meat, cut into bite-sized pieces

1/2 white onion, diced

5 garlic cloves, minced

1 quart homemade beef broth or purchased

2 cups dry red wine (table wine works well here)

2 cups water

1 large sprig fresh rosemary, chopped or 2 teaspoons dried

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 dried bay leaf

6 large carrots, peeled and cubed

7 medium yukon gold potatoes, cubed

1 1/2 tablespoons room temperature butter mixed with 1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (gluten-free flour can be substituted)

12 ounces frozen green peas

12-15 frozen pearl onions

2-3 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley, to garnish

salt and pepper, to taste

In a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed kettle, heat about 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat.  Sprinkle kosher salt and black pepper over the beef and add half of it to the hot pan.  Do not move it– let a nice dark golden color develop before flipping it over to brown the other sides.  Remove the caramelized meat from the pan and add the second batch, adding more olive oil if necessary.  When the second batch is done, remove that as well.

Add the diced onion and garlic to the hot pan.  Add a splash of beef broth if there are some darkened pieces that need some attention.  There is so much flavor in those pieces!  Continue to cook and stir  for a couple of minutes until the onion is somewhat softened, adding more broth if necessary.

Return the meat to the pan and add the remaining beef broth, red wine, water, rosemary, thyme, and bay leaf.  Add a bit of salt and pepper, too.  Bring to a near boil, then reduce the heat to a small simmer for about 2 hours.

When the beef is tender, add the potatoes and carrots to the pan and increase the heat to medium.  When the carrots and potatoes are fork tender, about 20-25 minutes, add the flour/butter mixture.  This will thicken the stew ever so slightly.  Gently, stir it in well.  Then add the peas and pearl onions and cook for another 3-5 minutes, or until the onions are warmed through.  Taste and adjust seasonings.  Don’t be scared to add more salt.  Serve with chopped fresh parsley.  Buttered crusty bread is a must with this meal. Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

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Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

I finally did the thing that’s been weighing on my mind for the last year.  I turned 40 years old on Tuesday.  My apprehension wasn’t about the number itself, or the accumulation of tiny wrinkles gathering under my eyes– it was heavier than that.  Those are superficial things that I can live with.  Instead, my dread has been a bit more existential.  Knowing that other inevitable changes are coming, like my children growing up, my parents aging, and that my limited time here is diminished with each passing year.  Those are the things that are harder to accept.

Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

But now that 40 has arrived, I’ve decided to do my best and be optimistic.  I’ll focus on the positives instead of dwelling on future loss.  I’m surrounded by  wonderful friends, and have been lucky enough to be born and married into two incredible families.  I get to spend every day with my best friend and love of 23 years, and we have two sweet children.  I’ve been fortunate with my health.  Right now, things are good by pretty much any standard.  I’m a lucky, lucky gal and I know it (and don’t think for one second that I didn’t knock on my wooden desk as I wrote that sentence).

Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

I’ve also decided to tackle new challenges.  My kids are at an age that I now have more time to pursue my own interests.  I’m ready to learn new things.  I want to take up pottery, learn to play the guitar and violin, to knit, and to read more.  I want to become more patient.  Mostly, I want to consciously be in the present, rather than always waiting for some vague future to just “happen”.   I also want to continue to learn new and exciting things about food and photography– this is the stuff that thrills me. Preparing the food, taking photos, and writing this blog make me very happy. I love connecting with all of you.

Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon | Relishing It

With that little essay out of the way, there’s really no subtle segue into a recipe post, so I’ll just throw it out there– today I made simple, roasted smashed potatoes.  They’re kind of a hard one to name, but hopefully the photos help you out a bit. These little gems are all about texture, texture, texture!  Soft and pillowy on the inside and perfectly crispy on the outside.  I love to pick them up and snack on them, but they also pair well with a burger or steak.  Throw any herbs you fancy on them, but I particularly love the rosemary/preserved lemon combination.  So, so good!  Enjoy these potatoes over the weekend and thanks for listening to me ramble.

The Recipe: Roasted Smashed Potatoes with Rosemary and Preserved Lemon

about 2 pounds of small yukon gold potatoes (halve or quarter larger ones)

1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary, plus fresh sprigs for serving

1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped preserved lemon

extra-virgin olive oil

good sea salt and freshly cracked pepper

Preheat oven to 400°F.  Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.  Set aside.

Begin by steaming the potatoes until they feel done when a knife is inserted into them– about 15-20 minutes (depending upon how big your potatoes are).  Remove from heat and continue to let sit in covered pan just to be certain they are fully cooked.

Dry the potatoes off if any water remains on them.  Then place them on the prepared baking sheet and gently smash them down with a fork.  You don’t want the potato to completely fall apart, but you do want some of the inside to be exposed– that way more crevices can become crisped.  Drizzle a few glugs of olive oil over the potatoes, then the chopped rosemary, salt, and pepper.  Roast for about 20-25 minutes, or until they have become a beautiful golden brown (check the bottoms, too).   Remove from oven and top with more olive oil, more rosemary, preserved lemon, and salt and pepper to taste.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

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Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini is not my favorite vegetable.  There, how’s that for an opening statement?  It truly isn’t, or wasn’t, rather.  It’s not that I really disliked zucchini, but in the past, if given the choice, I generally chose other ingredients to work with.  I thought of it as bland and lacking “personality.”  As it turns out, I’ve really come around to enjoying this wonderfully subtle vegetable.  It just took a little coaxing from a very good, very talented friend.

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing it

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

My friend, Amanda Paa, from HeartBeet Kitchen, has just published her very first cookbook, “Smitten with Squash”, dedicated entirely to that vegetable.  I first met Amanda a few years ago at a mutual food-blogger friend’s cabin.  I loved her ever-present smile and her calm demeanor.  She was chopping vegetables endlessly in the kitchen and more than happy to be doing so.  To say this girl is lovely doesn’t do her justice.  We both belong to the group Fortify (a local food group), so we continued to run into each other at events.  We eventually discovered that we live just a few blocks from one another.  We frequent the same restaurants, coffee shops, and farmers markets, and we never ever tire of talking about food together.  We’ve become wonderful friends and I couldn’t be happier to share a recipe from her new cookbook with you!

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

It’s fun to have the inside scoop on someone’s book-writing journey.  In some small way, it made me feel like I was part of it.  She worked so hard and spent much of her winter huddled-up writing.  The result is this wonderful book full of recipes for both summer and winter squash.  Sweet or savory, she’s covered it all and then some. If you’re looking for inspiration for this particular vegetable, this is the cookbook you need.

During her creative process, I had the opportunity test a few of her recipes.  This wonderful zucchini cauliflower gratin is a heaping dish of chopped vegetables seasoned with herbs and parmesan cheese. There is just enough cream in it to give it a proper gratin feel, but the added milk keeps it from being too heavy.  And every single bite is laced with just enough rosemary to keep you wanting another.  Lastly, the parmesan crust on the top adds a little cheesiness, with a nice contrast in texture.  I pile this gratin high on my plate with no regrets.  It’s perfect paired with a grilled meat and a glass of wine.  Not to mention my kids and husband all love it, too.

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

I’m giving away a copy of Amanda’s book to one lucky reader (only in the US– sorry)!  You want this book, you really do.  She gets so creative with this vegetable– you’ll want to cook through the entire thing.  Even if you aren’t the winner, I would encourage you to order it from Amazon or Barnes and Noble— you won’t be disappointed.  To enter, follow the instructions on the Rafflecopter link below.  Good Luck!

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It And to you, Amanda– I am so happy to call you a friend.  You are one of the most selfless and giving people I’ve met.  Congratulations on your beautiful book– I’m truly excited to see what comes next for you.

Enter Giveaway Here — a Rafflecopter giveaway

Update: The winner is Carolsue Anderson!  Thanks to all who entered.

The Recipe: Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin

(serves 4)

1 large head cauliflower

kosher salt

1 1/4 pounds zucchini, coarsely grated

2 tablespoons olive oil

3/4 cup chopped onion

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (or gluten-free all-purpose flour)

1/4 cup milk

1/3 cup heavy cream

2/3 cup grated parmesan, divided (or more!)

1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Prepare the cauliflower by removing the core and breaking the rest up into smaller pieces.  Then, using a food processor (or a sharp knife), pulse the cauliflower until they are tiny pieces that resemble rice grains.  Be care that the mixture doesn’t get mushy.  You may have to do this in batches.  You should yield about 3 1/2 cups.

Preheat oven to 375°F.  Lightly coat a shallow baking dish with olive oil and set aside. Stir 1 teaspoon salt and grated zucchini together, then place colander set over a bowl to drain.  In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat, add onions and a big pinch of salt, and cook stirring, until softened, about 4-5 minutes.   Meanwhile, squeeze handfuls of zucchini over a bowl to catch the juices, removing most of the water from the zucchini, yielding 2/3 cup shreds.

When the onion is softened, reduce heat to medium and stir in the cauliflower, garlic, zucchini, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and pepper.  Cook for about 7-8 minutes, until the vegetables are softened.  Sprinkle flour over the mixture and stir to combine.  Gradually stir in reserved zucchini water, milk, and cream, maintaining heat at medium so dairy does not curdle.  Cook for 2-3 minutes so liquid absorbs slightly. Remove from heat.  Stir in 1/3 cup parmesan, rosemary, and parsley.  Pour into prepared dish and bake for 20 minutes.  Remove from oven and top with remaining cheese (or more, if you like).  Return to the oven for another 10 or so minutes until gratin is brown and bubbly.  Sometimes I put the gratin under the broiler to brown up a bit faster for the final minute or two.  Enjoy!

Check out these other great blogs for more recipes from “Smitten with Squash”.  If you happen to live in the Twin Cities, be sure to stop by Solo Vino in St. Paul from 5:00-7:30 this evening for Amanda’s first book signing– I’ll be there, too!

A Farmgirl’s Dabbles — Bumper Crop Spicy Squash Pickles

Fresh Tart — Chimichurri Chicken and Vegetable Kabobs

Robin Writes — Garam Masala Dusted Pattypans & Crispy Chickpeas with Tahini Sauce

Dolly and Oatmeal — Banana and Oat Streusel Summer Squash Muffins

Healthy Green Kitchen — Cherry Tomato and Summer Squash Cobbler with Rosemary Biscuits

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

 

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Sun-Dried Tomatoes with Rosemary and Thyme | Relishing It

Alright, I’m using “sun-dried” very loosely here, as these little beauties are not…well…sun-dried at all.  I just couldn’t bring myself to call these “sitting on a counter in a dehydrator” tomatoes.  No, I like to imagine that they were patiently crafted in Italy, with tables upon tables of tomatoes laying out in the sun, as I sipped a Chianti and and read a good book.  Alas, my reality is Minnesota, and I used a food dehydrator.  Not quite as romantic, is it?  Even so, these tomatoes are fantastic, and seriously recommend you give making them a try.

Sun-Dried Tomatoes with Rosemary and Thyme | Relishing It

I love having a nice supply of sun-dried tomatoes to get me through the winter.  Buying jarred versions at the market can be expensive, and to be honest, they’re just so simple to make.  You can use any type of tomato, though smaller ones will require less cooking time.  Roma’s are a fantastic choice– simply cut them in half or quarters.  The tomatoes take time to dehydrate– perhaps a day or more for the thicker end pieces.  I sprinkle mine with rosemary, thyme, with a little sea salt and cracked black pepper.   The flavors are wonderful!

Su-Dried Tomatoes with Rosemary and Thyme | Relishing It

You can snack on them as soon as they’re dried, or preserve them to use later.  As for the texture, some like them a bit chewier– I made sure mine were completely dry since I intended to preserve them.  It’s really up to you how dry you want them to be.  These tomatoes can be kept in airtight containers (plastic bags work well), vacuum sealed, or even stored in the freezer.  I also made a jar of sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil, and they are ridiculously delicious.  These would make fabulous gifts around the holidays if you’re looking for something homemade to share.  I hope you give these a try!

Sun-Dried Tomatoes with Rosemary and Thyme | Relishing It

Sun-Dried Tomatoes with Rosemary and Thyme | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Sun-Dried Tomatoes with Rosemary and Thyme

any variety of tomatoes, sliced or halved

fresh rosemary, chopped

fresh thyme, chopped

sea salt and fresh cracked pepper

To Dehydrate the Tomatoes:  Slice the tomatoes or half them, depending upon their size.   Sprinkle with the chopped herbs, salt and pepper.  It will take about 24 hours to dehydrate a full load, sometimes longer depending upon how thick the tomatoes are sliced.  Store in a resealable bag and use within a few weeks.  Freeze any amount you want to keep longer.

To Oven-Dry them:  Preheat oven to 200°F.  Slice tomatoes and sprinkle with chopped herbs, salt and pepper.  Place on a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper.  It will generally take between 2-6 hours (possibly more) to dry the tomatoes– much will depend upon how thickly they are sliced.  Store in a resealable bag and use within a few weeks.  Freeze any amount you want to keep longer.

To make Sun-Dried Tomatoes in Olive Oil:  Prepare dehydrated tomatoes by dipping them in white wine vinegar (this help keep bacterial growth from occuring) and shaking off any excess.  Place in a small jar along with 1/2 cup of red wine vinegar.  Then fill the jar up with olive oil.  Make sure that all of the tomatoes are submerged.  Store in the refrigerator and try to use within 2 weeks.  If placing fresh herbs or garlic into your mix, you must use up the jar within 1 week.  The olive oil will become hard in the refrigerator, simple let sit at room temperature for a few minutes before using.  Be mindful to use clean utensils when removing the tomatoes from the jar.

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It today!

Laurie

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Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella | Relishing It

I have just a few more tomato recipes that I want to share with all of you before tomato season disappears with the nice weather.  The first is this wonderful Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella.  As my husband stated after taking a bite, “That’s one of the best things I’ve eaten all summer.  Maybe ever”.  True story.

Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella | Relishing It

Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella | Relishing It

Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella | Relishing It

Yes, yes, tomatoes and fresh mozzarella are a heavenly match– we all know that, right?  But generally, fresh mozzarella isn’t baked into a galette with tomatoes due to its water content.  Much harder cheeses are the norm.  Obviously I was a bit hesitant in trying the fresh mozzarella– I had visions of a huge sloppy mess ruining that wonderful crust.  There was even a moment during the baking time when I peered into the oven and almost cried.  There was a lot of liquid pooling.  I was certain the galette was ruined.  I mention this, because if you see the same pooling– just wait it out.  By the end of the baking time, the water was gone and a beautiful crisp crust was left behind with cheese that had bubbled up into a golden brown.  The smell of the the baked tomatoes and cheese with the herbs was unbelievable.

Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella | Relishing It

Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella | Relishing It

This galette comes together so quickly, especially if you have pie crusts hanging out in your freezer (have I mentioned that you definitely should get on that?).  And it’s a perfect meal when you want to fancy things up a bit.  Add a salad to the side, and perhaps a glass of wine and you’re set.  Now go and enjoy the heck out of those tomatoes before they’re gone for the season!

Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Tomato Galette with Herbs and Fresh Mozzarella

(serves 4 or 1, depending upon how hungry you are)

1 single All-Butter Pie Crust

2-3 ripe tomatoes, sliced

about 1/4 pound of fresh mozzarella, sliced

a hefty sprinkling of chopped fresh rosemary and thyme, plus more for garnish

1 egg mixed with 1 teaspoon water, for egg wash

salt, pepper, plus olive oil for drizzling

Preheat oven to 375°F.

Follow the instructions for the All-Butter Pie Crust.  After it has chilled it will be ready to use.  Roll the dough out into an 11-inch circle (not the typical 12-inch, because I want the crust to be a bit sturdier) on a piece of floured parchment paper.  Place the mozzarella into the center of the dough, leaving about 1 1/2 inch border.  Sprinkle the chopped herbs on the cheese.  Then place the tomatoes on top of that.  Fold up the sides of the galette and pinch the seams together.  Using a pastry brush, apply the egg wash to the dough.  Then sprinkle salt and pepper onto the egg wash.  Slide the galette and parchment paper onto a large rimmed baking sheet.  Bake for 45-50 minutes or until the crust is a deep golden brown and the cheese has bubbled up and browned a bit, too.  Remove from oven and let cool for a few minutes.  Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with fresh herbs, salt and pepper before serving.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by today!

Laurie

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Simple White Beans with Rosemary and Garlic

Greetings friends!  It feels so good to be back here at Relishing It.  Turns out my Summer vacation from posting lasted a little longer than I intended.  At any rate, I’ve missed writing and talking with all of you.  I hope you’ve had a fantastic few months.  Life has been great in my little corner of Minnesota.  The holidays were good to us– we had beautiful traveling weather for our trip back to North Dakota, where we were able to spend time with our families.  Everyone remains in good health, and that is basically all that I need.

Simple White Beans with Rosemary and Garlic via Relishing It

Despite not writing as much lately, I’ve been very busy in the kitchen making new things.  I’ve tried desperately to not bake quite so much, because frankly, we just don’t need all those sweets around.  But…I’ve fallen short of keeping that vow every couple of weeks.  Simply put, I love to bake.  It makes me (and my kids) happy.  So now I’ve modified the vow– we just share more.

I’ve spent the rest of my time in the kitchen preparing healthy and delicious meals.  The pressure to ‘change your diet!’ and ‘lose weight!’ always amps up this time of year, but to be honest, I’m pretty content with where we are.  While I do make foods with butter, oils, sugar, and flour, I do my best to use limited amounts, or find healthier alternatives.  Not to sound too preachy, but there really isn’t a thing I’d change about my diet (especially with the ‘share baked goods vow’).  And that feels pretty good.

I continue to try to learn about how various foods affect my body, as well as how the production of those foods affects the environment.  And I feel lucky to have connected with so many people that feel the same way.  I want to stay healthy and fit for me and for my family, so I stick with the mantra that whole foods and exercise are the key.  If you’ve come here looking for healthy ideas for family meals, you’ll see there’s plenty to choose from.  I love helping people figure out how to eat “clean”.  It’s easier than you think.  Just stay away from packages and long lists of ingredients, add more vegetables, and eat whole foods.  You’ll be amazed.

Simple White Beans with Rosemary and Garlic via Relishing It

This simple pot of beans is a good example of the type of meal I’m talking about.  It’s not fancy, but is perfect for a cold night.  This dish is creamy, comforting, and bold.  The flavors can change dramatically depending on how you season this one, so play to your palate.  If you like Dijon, add a bit more.  Want more of a tang, be liberal with the vinegar.  Play around with it a bit!  The recipe below is how I enjoy it the most.  I generally make a batch of these beans and we eat half of it served alongside roasted buttercup squash (they’re perfect together).  I freeze the other half, and then use it in a simple cassoulet for a quick weeknight meal.  For that cassoulet, prepare some kielbasa sausage and/or some leftover pork shoulder, cut it into chunks,  place it in a shallow baking dish, cover with the thawed then re-warmed white beans, and top with some panko bread crumbs.  Bake at about 375°F for 10-15 minutes (or until the bread crumbs are toasted).  Sprinkle with fresh parsley, and voila!

Simple White Beans with Rosemary and Garlic via Relishing It

The Recipe:  Simple White Beans with Rosemary and Garlic

Serves 4-6

3 cups dried white beans (preferably cannellini, buy navy would work, too)

1/2 large white onion, chopped

2 bulbs garlic, peeled

2 large sprigs of fresh rosemary, chopped

a few sprigs of fresh thyme, left whole

1 dried bay leaf

extra-virgin olive oil

kosher salt and cracked pepper

1-2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

1 heaping tablespoon Dijon mustard

Begin by either covering the white beans with cold water in a large pot and soaking overnight (which I never do) or do a quick-soak method (which I always do) by placing the beans in a large pot or Dutch oven, cover with cold water and a sprinkle of kosher salt.  Bring the beans to a boil.  Boil for one minute.  Remove pot from heat and cover with a lid.  Let sit for two hours.  Drain beans when ready to use.

In that same Dutch oven, to the beans add the chopped onion, garlic cloves (from the two bulbs), chopped rosemary, whole sprigs of thyme, bay leaf, a bit of kosher salt and cracked black pepper.  Just barely cover the beans with fresh cold water.  Then add a couple of glugs of olive oil — about 1/4 cup.   Bring to a boil, then immediately reduce heat to a medium/low simmer.  Let cook for about one hour, stirring every so often, or until the beans are your desired consistency.  I like mine to be rather soft, but still hold their shape a bit.

When they are done cooking, remove from the heat.  Remove the thyme twigs and the bay leaf.  Using an old potato masher or a fork, mash a few of the beans to thicken them up a bit,  3/4 cup or so.  Add the Dijon and red wine vinegar and stir a bit to emulsify.  Re-season with more salt and pepper.  Drizzle with a bit more olive oil when serving and some fresh thyme leaves on top.    Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by!  xo

Laurie

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