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Simple Pasta with Garlic, Chilies, and Lemon | Relishing It

This dish takes me back to my college years, except this is the grown-up version.  One of my go-to meals in college was a bowl of pasta with a splash of olive oil and a sprinkle of fresh parmesan– eaten with some of my girlfriends, of course.  There was rarely a time that I wasn’t in the mood for it and it always hit the spot.  So very simple.  A few many years later, this still remains a favorite comfort meal of mine, with a few tweaks, of course.

Simple Pasta with Garlic, Chilies, and Lemon | Relishing It

A delicious stunner of a meal doesn’t have to be complicated or take up your entire night to prepare.  This dish takes only minutes. In fact, in the time it takes to boil the water and cook the pasta you are finished.  Not bad, right?

Simple Pasta with Garlic, Chilies, and Lemon | Relishing It

The robust flavors are what make me love this dish.  Pungent garlic, spicy chili peppers, bright lemon juice and zest, fresh nutty parmesan, vibrant parsley, and even an anchovy (if you are so inclined) give this meal a wonderful depth.  You can customize it to fit your family’s needs, of course.  Not into spicy food?  Go ahead and skip the peppers.  I generally double the amount of spice when I make it for myself– I can’t get it hot enough.  The main trick of this dish, is to know that the finished pasta has to be thinned out with some reserved pasta water.  This is key.  The pasta water (containing all of its starches) clings to the pasta and creates a light, creamy sauce with the parmesan and olive oil.  It’s magical.  So, don’t be afraid to loosen it up with that water– it’s a necessity!

Simple Pasta with Garlic, Chiles, and Lemon | Relishing It

Another tip to know is that the garlic, onion, chili pepper, lemon zest, and hot pepper flakes need to be sautéed in the olive oil while the pasta is cooking.  This is important because it infuses the oil with a ton of flavor, but you’ll want to keep the temperature on the low side, so the garlic doesn’t burn.  This is a perfect meal when you are in the mood for delicious comfort food, but are a bit short on time.  Admittedly, this is not one of Radd’s favorite pasta dishes, which stuns me because it’s so amazing (he tends to lean toward the meat-full varieties), so I’ve written the recipe to serve one.  You can easily adjust if you are aiming for a larger portion.  Hope you enjoy!

Simple Pasta with Garlic, Chilies, and Lemon | Relishing It

The Recipe: Simple Pasta with Garlic, Chilies, and Lemon

(serves 1)

3 ounces long pasta (thin spaghetti works well here)

about 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, use more if needed

2 tablespoons finely minced red or white onion, or shallot

2 garlic cloves, finely minced

1 small anchovy, finely minced (optional, of course)

1 red chili pepper, finely minced (scale back or add more according to taste)

sprinkle of hot pepper flakes

zest of 1 lemon

juice of 1/2 lemon

1/4 cup good quality parmesan or grana padano cheese

large handful of freshly chopped parsley

1 cup of reserved pasta water (you most likely will not use all of it)

salt and pepper

Fill a large saucepan with water and bring to a boil.  While the water is heating, chop the ingredients.

Add the dry pasta to the boiling water, be sure to add salt.

While the pasta is cooking, heat a small skillet with olive oil and add the garlic, onion, chili peppers, hot pepper flakes, lemon zest, and anchovy (if using).  Sauté over low-medium heat, stirring regularly.  Keep a watchful eye, so the garlic doesn’t burn.  You want to infuse the olive oil with all the flavors.  The vegetables should be tender by the time the pasta is finished cooking, or even a bit before.

Reserve about 1 cup of the cooking water and set aside.  Drain the pasta and add it to the skillet with the vegetables.  Add most of the cheese (reserving some to sprinkle on top), lemon juice, and a bit of the pasta water.  Combine using tongs.  Add more water, if you want it looser.  Season with a bit of salt and pepper, and top with the remaining parmesan, fresh parsley, and more red pepper flakes.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

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Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini is not my favorite vegetable.  There, how’s that for an opening statement?  It truly isn’t, or wasn’t, rather.  It’s not that I really disliked zucchini, but in the past, if given the choice, I generally chose other ingredients to work with.  I thought of it as bland and lacking “personality.”  As it turns out, I’ve really come around to enjoying this wonderfully subtle vegetable.  It just took a little coaxing from a very good, very talented friend.

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing it

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

My friend, Amanda Paa, from HeartBeet Kitchen, has just published her very first cookbook, “Smitten with Squash”, dedicated entirely to that vegetable.  I first met Amanda a few years ago at a mutual food-blogger friend’s cabin.  I loved her ever-present smile and her calm demeanor.  She was chopping vegetables endlessly in the kitchen and more than happy to be doing so.  To say this girl is lovely doesn’t do her justice.  We both belong to the group Fortify (a local food group), so we continued to run into each other at events.  We eventually discovered that we live just a few blocks from one another.  We frequent the same restaurants, coffee shops, and farmers markets, and we never ever tire of talking about food together.  We’ve become wonderful friends and I couldn’t be happier to share a recipe from her new cookbook with you!

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

It’s fun to have the inside scoop on someone’s book-writing journey.  In some small way, it made me feel like I was part of it.  She worked so hard and spent much of her winter huddled-up writing.  The result is this wonderful book full of recipes for both summer and winter squash.  Sweet or savory, she’s covered it all and then some. If you’re looking for inspiration for this particular vegetable, this is the cookbook you need.

During her creative process, I had the opportunity test a few of her recipes.  This wonderful zucchini cauliflower gratin is a heaping dish of chopped vegetables seasoned with herbs and parmesan cheese. There is just enough cream in it to give it a proper gratin feel, but the added milk keeps it from being too heavy.  And every single bite is laced with just enough rosemary to keep you wanting another.  Lastly, the parmesan crust on the top adds a little cheesiness, with a nice contrast in texture.  I pile this gratin high on my plate with no regrets.  It’s perfect paired with a grilled meat and a glass of wine.  Not to mention my kids and husband all love it, too.

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It

I’m giving away a copy of Amanda’s book to one lucky reader (only in the US– sorry)!  You want this book, you really do.  She gets so creative with this vegetable– you’ll want to cook through the entire thing.  Even if you aren’t the winner, I would encourage you to order it from Amazon or Barnes and Noble— you won’t be disappointed.  To enter, follow the instructions on the Rafflecopter link below.  Good Luck!

Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin | Relishing It And to you, Amanda– I am so happy to call you a friend.  You are one of the most selfless and giving people I’ve met.  Congratulations on your beautiful book– I’m truly excited to see what comes next for you.

Enter Giveaway Here — a Rafflecopter giveaway

Update: The winner is Carolsue Anderson!  Thanks to all who entered.

The Recipe: Zucchini Cauliflower Summer Gratin

(serves 4)

1 large head cauliflower

kosher salt

1 1/4 pounds zucchini, coarsely grated

2 tablespoons olive oil

3/4 cup chopped onion

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (or gluten-free all-purpose flour)

1/4 cup milk

1/3 cup heavy cream

2/3 cup grated parmesan, divided (or more!)

1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Prepare the cauliflower by removing the core and breaking the rest up into smaller pieces.  Then, using a food processor (or a sharp knife), pulse the cauliflower until they are tiny pieces that resemble rice grains.  Be care that the mixture doesn’t get mushy.  You may have to do this in batches.  You should yield about 3 1/2 cups.

Preheat oven to 375°F.  Lightly coat a shallow baking dish with olive oil and set aside. Stir 1 teaspoon salt and grated zucchini together, then place colander set over a bowl to drain.  In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat, add onions and a big pinch of salt, and cook stirring, until softened, about 4-5 minutes.   Meanwhile, squeeze handfuls of zucchini over a bowl to catch the juices, removing most of the water from the zucchini, yielding 2/3 cup shreds.

When the onion is softened, reduce heat to medium and stir in the cauliflower, garlic, zucchini, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and pepper.  Cook for about 7-8 minutes, until the vegetables are softened.  Sprinkle flour over the mixture and stir to combine.  Gradually stir in reserved zucchini water, milk, and cream, maintaining heat at medium so dairy does not curdle.  Cook for 2-3 minutes so liquid absorbs slightly. Remove from heat.  Stir in 1/3 cup parmesan, rosemary, and parsley.  Pour into prepared dish and bake for 20 minutes.  Remove from oven and top with remaining cheese (or more, if you like).  Return to the oven for another 10 or so minutes until gratin is brown and bubbly.  Sometimes I put the gratin under the broiler to brown up a bit faster for the final minute or two.  Enjoy!

Check out these other great blogs for more recipes from “Smitten with Squash”.  If you happen to live in the Twin Cities, be sure to stop by Solo Vino in St. Paul from 5:00-7:30 this evening for Amanda’s first book signing– I’ll be there, too!

A Farmgirl’s Dabbles — Bumper Crop Spicy Squash Pickles

Fresh Tart — Chimichurri Chicken and Vegetable Kabobs

Robin Writes — Garam Masala Dusted Pattypans & Crispy Chickpeas with Tahini Sauce

Dolly and Oatmeal — Banana and Oat Streusel Summer Squash Muffins

Healthy Green Kitchen — Cherry Tomato and Summer Squash Cobbler with Rosemary Biscuits

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

 

 

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Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

In case you haven’t caught on yet, I’m a huge advocate of having a pantry stuffed with dried goods.  Legumes, grains, you name it, I’ve got it in a mason jar ready for use.  And on those occasions when I notice it isn’t stocked full, I briefly panic and then run out to replenish whatever is missing.  I guess it’s almost a compulsion, since it’s not like I’m going to not have access to food– I live a few blocks from our co-op.  I may be a little crazy, but I embrace it.

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

Summer is a great time to combine those dried goods with some of the season’s freshest offerings.  I love the combination of peas and pesto.  Using dried yellow and green split peas here works beautifully and is absolutely stunning to look at.  The sliced scallion on top provides a nice crunch and a burst of freshness.  This salad is also very filling– it’s one of those that can be a stand-alone meal.  And with a smaller portion size, it pairs wonderfully with most any grilled foods.

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

About this time of year, I also start to make large batches of pesto to freeze for the winter.  I’ll pop a small portion into ice cube trays or muffin tins to fully freeze.  I then pop them out, wrap them in plastic wrap, and put them into freezer bags (or use my vacuum sealer).  It’s a wonderful treat in the cold winter months to have pesto to mix into pasta or to dollop into soups.  If you choose to do this– a word of advice.  If you blanch your greens for just 30 seconds or so, then put it into an ice bath to stop the cooking process and proceed with the recipe–your pesto will remain a beautiful, vibrant green, even after it has been frozen.  I always use this method if I’m planning to freeze my pesto, or even if I know I’m going to have leftovers that may sit in my refrigerator for a few days.  The color just ‘pops’.  One more trick regarding pesto, remember you have the option to add a bit of water instead of more olive oil to loosen it up if it’s a bit thick.  Either way, be sure to season it appropriately with kosher salt– the right amount can make the pesto sing!  Enjoy!

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

The Recipe: Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto

(serves 4-6)

Large bed of leafy lettuce leaves

1 cup dried green split peas

1 cup dried yellow split peas

1 bunch of sliced scallions to garnish

For the Pesto:

1 cup packed basil leaves

1/4 cup packed Italian leaf parsley

3 cloves garlic, smashed

1/4 cup grated parmesan or grana padano cheese

1/4 cup walnut halves, toasted and roughly chopped

1/3 – 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, or more

sprinkle of hot pepper flakes

kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

To cook the Split Peas:  Rinse the peas and place in a large saucepan.  Cover with salted water, making sure that about two inches of water are above the peas.  Bring to a boil, then reduce to a medium/low.  Cook for about 25 minutes, then begin testing them for doneness.  You may need to cook them longer, depending upon how high your heat was.  You will want them to be soft, but retain their shape.  Be careful not to overcook them, or they will turn to mush.  When done, drain the water and let cool.

To make the Pesto:  As I stated above, you can choose to blanch the greens or not, depending upon how fast you’re going to use the pesto.  You decide.  Place either the blanched or unblanched basil and parsley into a small food processor (use a large one, if making a bigger batch).  Pulse a few times to chop up a bit.  Add the parmesan, walnuts, garlic, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt and pepper.  Pulse a couple more times to combine.  With the machine running on low, slowly begin adding the olive oil.  Scrape down the sides, as necessary.  Add as much olive oil to reach your desired consistency.  Or, add a few tablespoons of water at the very end to loosen it up a bit.  Re-season with salt and pepper.  Use right away, or place in the refrigerator with plastic wrap tightly pushed onto it’s surface, or freeze.

Place the lettuce leave onto a large platter.  Mix the cooled split peas with about 1/3 cup of the pesto, use more if desired.  Add salt and pepper, if needed.  Pour mixture over the lettuce, top with sliced scallions, and a drizzle of good olive oil.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by today!

xo

Laurie

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This is one of my family’s favorite weeknight meals.  It’s quick, easy, pretty healthy, and best of all it tastes fantastic.  The pea and mint combination is so refreshing– it’s perfect for this time of the year and will remind you of Spring.  Ideally, I like to use fresh peas in this dish, but frozen ones make an exceptional alternative.  And the little salty bites of crisp, smoky bacon are a nice contrast to the fresh flavors.

Now I love a good, rich carbonara– really, I do.  But this dish is not thick and creamy.  This is a much lighter version that contains very little cream and only one egg.  Despite this, it works remarkably well.   I reserve the heavy version for an evening when I feel like being a bit more indulgent,  but for our everyday meals, I cut back significantly.  The key to this recipe is to remember that it’s really just an outline.  Use as much bacon, mint, peas, and parmesan cheese as you like- it’s a matter of personal taste.  My family loves peas, so we use an entire package.  You can certainly add more parmesan, as well.  Just remember to loosen the pasta with reserved pasta water to get the level of creaminess that you want.  And most importantly, be ready to eat this dish immediately.  The creaminess will not last long, so it’s best served right away.

One last thing:  be sure to enter my cookbook giveaway I’m having to celebrate Relishing It’s First Anniversary– enter here!

The Recipe: Whole Wheat Pasta Carbonara with Bacon, Peas, and Mint

(Makes 4 servings)

1  pound of whole wheat spaghetti or linguine

1 10 ounce package of organic sweet peas

6-8 slices bacon, or more to taste

handful of grated parmesan or grana padano cheese (about 1/2 cup)

about 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

1 large organic egg lightly beaten with 1/4 cup organic heavy cream

a few grates of fresh nutmeg

Cook the bacon in a large skillet until crisp.  Remove from pan and wipe pan clean with a paper towel.  Chop the bacon and set aside.   In a small bowl lightly beat the egg, cream, and nutmeg together.  Set aside.  Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to directions on package.  Add the peas into the hot water when the pasta is one minute from being “al dente”.  Reserve one cup of the pasta water.  Drain pasta and peas and pour into the skillet the bacon was cooked into.  Pour the egg/cream/nutmeg mixture over the hot pasta and toss with thongs.  The hot pasta will cook the egg.  Add a bit of the reserved pasta water to loosen the pasta more, if you desire.  Sprinkle the parmesan over the pasta.  Top with the chopped bacon and chopped mint.  Eat immediately!  Enjoy.

Source:  Adapted from Jamie Oliver’s Jamie’s Dinners

Thanks for stopping by!

Laurie

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If you happen to have gorged on too much of this dip from Friday’s post, have no fear.  Today it’s all about health food.  This light, fresh, kale salad is one of my favorites.  Kale is one of those all-important super foods that is loaded with vitamins and antioxidants.  Here is a little run-down on just how good it is for you.  Personally, I probably eat more kale than any other vegetable.  It’s such an important part of my daily diet, that I eat nearly one bunch per day– by myself.  We also make kale chips very often.  My three-year old loves them, and despite the fact that Radd jokes about ‘being forced to eat kale’, he likes them too.

I think the way people view kale has changed significantly in the last decade or so.  In college I worked for the university dining service.  I remember being told to put the kale all around the salad bar to make it look “pretty”.  It was never prepared for a meal, but strictly used as a garnish because it was green and firm.  I’m glad that we’ve moved past the “kale-as-a-garnish” phase.  It’s so delicious, and so good for you.

On to this fantastic salad.  If you haven’t eaten raw kale before, this Tuscan kale salad is a great place to start.  The salad really highlights the wonderful aspects of raw kale– though note that this salad really should only be made with Tuscan kale.  It’s the variety that is tender enough to still be edible uncooked.  The dressing is a perfect match.  I’ve made it with each of the three cheeses, listed below.  They all work wonderfully.  I love the fact that the cheese is mixed right into the dressing– it makes it a bit creamier.  Also, I tend to like things a little heavy on the garlic-side.  If you don’t , adjust to your particular taste.  The toasted bread crumbs are a nice touch as well.  They add that little textural crunch, without resorting to whole oil-ladened croutons.  Give this salad a try– you’ll like it.

The Recipe: Raw Tuscan Kale Salad

1 bunch Tuscan kale (also know as black, dinosaur, or lacinato)

1 slice whole wheat bread

1 clove garlic

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 cup finely grated parmesan cheese (grand padano or pecorino work well, too)

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 lemon (about 4 tablespoons)

Red pepper flakes, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

To make the breadcrumbs: Tear the piece of bread into small sections and place in a mini- food processor.  Pulse a few times until the mixture resembles small breadcrumbs.  Place the breadcrumbs into a small skillet on medium heat.  Stir frequently and toast them until they are crunchy, but not burnt, just a couple of minutes.  Remove them from the heat and set aside.

To make the dressing:  Using a chef’s knife, mince then mash the garlic glove and place into a medium-sized bowl.  Add the salt and mix it together until a paste forms.  Add the cheese, lemon juice, olive oil, cracked black pepper, and red pepper flakes.  Whisk to combine.  Taste.  Adjust seasonings, if necessary.

To make the salad:  Wash and remove the thick “stem” from the center of the kale leaves and discard.  Cut the kale into thin ribbons.  Place the kale in a large salad bowl and pour some of the dressing on it.  Mix well, as the dressing is thick.  I tend not to use the entire amount of dressing on my salad, though you may enjoy your salads more dressed than I do.  Let the salad sit for about 5 minutes (if you can wait, I usually can’t) and top with the whole wheat bread crumbs.  Enjoy!

Source: Adapted from Melissa Clark’s In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite

I hope the start to your week is a great one — thanks for stopping by!

Laurie

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Last week I told you I’d have another fabulous recipe for you to use up any left-over winter squash you have from this dish.  Here it is, and it’s a remarkable Squash Ravioli, which also happens to be one of my favorite meals.  I’ve always felt that homemade pasta is the perfect comfort food– and pairing it with squash and browned butter with sage makes for a sublime Autumn dinner.

Browned butter and sage sauce is so simple to make, yet the incredible flavor will really stay with you.  I crave this sauce for weeks after we make this dish– you will too.  Seriously, it’s that good.  It perfectly compliments the sweetness of the squash, the creamy ricotta cheese, and the hint of freshly-grated nutmeg– all of which make up the filling.  The walnuts add texture to counter the pillow-soft ravioli.  And topping almost anything with Parmesan cheese makes it a little bit better.  Serve the ravioli with the crispy sage leaves (if you can keep yourself from eating them before dinner).

Now I know making homemade pasta may not be on your agenda.  Here’s the thing, though– fresh pasta really is that much better than the dried varieties you see at the market.  There’s no comparison.  And as I’ve said before, if you make it a family project you’ll enjoy the process, rather than thinking of it as just preparation.  As for the equipment, while it’s certainly easier to use a food processor and pasta roller, all you really need are strong arms, a sturdy wooden spoon, and a rolling pin.  Hey, it’s exercise, right?  Give it a try and you’ll be pleasantly surprised by how satisfying it is to make your own pasta.  And even more satisfying when you get to fill it with amazing ingredients like this.

The Recipe:  Squash Ravioli with Browned Butter and Sage

The Pasta Dough:

(Makes 1 pound of dough)

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 large whole eggs

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

3 tablespoons water

1 egg (reserved for ravioli wash)

The Squash Filling:

1 1/2 cups squash puree

1/2 cup ricotta cheese

1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon cracked pepper

Browned Butter and Sage Sauce:

1 stick unsalted butter

6 sage leaves

2/3 cup water

1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

salt and pepper

1/2 cup toasted walnuts

To make the pasta dough:  Mix 2 eggs and olive oil into a measuring cup.  Add 3 tablespoons water (or however much needed to reach 7 fluid ounces).  Put the flour into a food processor fitted with a regular blade and pulse a couple of times to aerate (there will not be enough dough to successfully use the dough blade).  Start running the machine and pour the egg mixture down the feed tube, carefully getting every drop in there.  A dough ball should form quickly.  Do not process for more that 40 seconds total.  Turn machine off and turn dough onto a lightly floured surface.  Knead by hand for  a half minute, or until it’s smooth.  Form it into a ball and wrap it tightly with plastic wrap.  Let rest at room temperature for at least a half hour.   Store in the refrigerator for a day, or freeze for a month or more.  Defrost in the refrigerator and let sit at room temperature before rolling.

To bake the squash: Preheat oven to 375°F.  Place a quartered, seeded squash on a cookie sheet lined with aluminum foil.  Cover with foil and bake until soft and tender, 35-45 minutes.  Let cool.  Scoop out flesh into food processor.  Add a bit of water if necessary and puree until smooth.  Cool.

To make the filling:  Add the squash, ricotta cheese, nutmeg, salt and pepper to a bowl.  Mix and set aside.  There may be some leftover filling.  Refrigerate and enjoy by the spoonfuls the next day.

To form the ravioli:  Quarter the dough ball.  Use a pasta machine or roll each section by hand.  Making sure to flour your work surface well.  The goal is to get the dough very thin and long.  Once you achieve this, straighten up the sides, if necessary and cover.  Repeat with another quarter of the dough.  You’ll want to get two matching sections.  Make the ravioli however big you like.  Using a pastry brush, apply an egg wash (beaten egg) along the edges of each ravioli.  Place a tablespoon of filling in the middle of each section and top with the other section of dough.  Press the dough together along the egg wash– this will seal the filling inside.  Use a pasta cutter to cut the ravioli into sections.  Or use a knife and press down with fork tines to seal.

To make the browned butter and sage sauce:  In a medium-sized sauce pan, place a stick of butter and the sage leaves.  Begin to brown the butter until it’s fragrant and has a nice caramel color.  Stir frequently.  Add 2/3 cup of pasta water and cook for another 3-4 minutes.  Remove from heat.

Place the ravioli in a large pot of salted, boiling water.  You will want to work in batches.  Place three ravioli (depending upon the size of your pot) into the water.  Cook for about three minutes.  The dough will shrink and tightly enclose the mound of filling when done.   Remove from water and repeat with remaining ravioli.  Toss the cooked ravioli into the brown butter and sage sauce immediately, so they don’t stick together.  When serving, sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and the toasted walnuts.  Enjoy!

Source:  Pasta and Sauce adapted from Lidia Bastiancich’s Lidia’s Family Table

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!  Have a great day.

Laurie

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