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Posts Tagged ‘Savory’

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

Pincho Moruno.  That’s a fancy title, no?  Don’t be intimidated– this incredible dish is basically a kabob-like stick made of meat.  And since it’s grilling season, these spiced chicken thighs are a perfect addition to your barbecue rotation.  The recipe comes from this beautiful book by Jeffrey Weiss. It’s titled Charcutería: The Soul of Spain and it is a stunning, mouthwatering read. Jeffery is a professional chef with fifteen years under his belt. He is one of only a few Americans to win the ICEX culinary scholarship that allowed him to live in Spain and learn its regional cuisines, as well as to cook with some of Spain’s top chefs. From that experience comes this amazing cookbook.

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

After paging through it, I immediately knew what I wanted to make. I couldn’t stop thinking about the Pincho Moruno. I love to make kabobs in summer. Sometimes I marinate the meat, sometimes I don’t. This recipe includes a marinade so delicious you’ll want to make it over and over again. At first glance, you may think there are too many steps and the list of ingredients is too lengthy. But trust me, the steps are relatively quick– basically mixing dry spices together. And all of the spices listed were ones I already had in my spice cabinet. In fact, the only thing I didn’t have for this recipe was the chicken thighs– I’m guessing you’ll have most everything, too.

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

The adobo sauce is the real star here.  I’ve always been a fan of adobo, but this was my first foray into making a homemade version.  It was far easier than I anticipated, and the flavor is, well, incredible.  The spices paired with the sherry vinegar, garlic, and olive oil are perfection.  You’ll want to invite friends over to show this one off– trust me.

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs) | Relishing It

The Recipe: Pincho Moruno (Adobo Marinated Chicken Kabobs)

About 2 pounds of boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces (pork tenderloin, lamb shoulder, pork belly, chicken or beef hearts are also options)

1 medium yellow onion, julienned

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons sherry vinegar

kosher salt, to taste

1 recipe Basic Adobo

4 tablespoons Moruno Spice

Basic Adobo:

5 cloves garlic, crushed

1 tablespoon kosher salt

1 tablespoon dried oregano

2 tablespoons pimentón dulce (sweet paprika)

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup sherry vinegar

1/4 cup water

Moruno Spice: 

2 tablespoons cumin seeds

1 tablespoon coriander seeds

1 tablespoon fennel seeds

1 tablespoon black peppercorns

pinch of saffron threads

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon dried thyme

1 tablespoon pimentón dulce (sweet paprika)

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

1 1/2 teaspoons ground turmeric

Begin by making the Basic Adobo.  In a food processor, or by hand, mix all of the ingredients together until it forms a bright red paste.  Use immediately, or store in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

Next, mix together the Moruno Spice.  In a small dry skillet toast the cumin, coriander, and fennel seeds; peppercorns; and saffron threads for about 2-3 minutes, or until fragrant and toasted.  Use a mortar and pestle or spice mill to grind the spices into a fine powder.  Transfer to a small mixing bowl, and add the oregano, thyme, pimentón dulce, black pepper, and turmeric.  Stir and set aside.  (Note: This mixture will make a bit more than you will need for this recipe.  Leftovers can be stored in an airtight container for up to 6 months.)

In a large bowl, combine the Basic Adobo, 4 tablespoons of Moruno Spice, olive oil, sherry vinegar, and yellow onion together.  Season with salt to your taste.  Add the chicken and mix to coat evenly.  Cover and refrigerate between 4-24 hours.  Slip the chicken onto skewers when ready to grill.  If using wooden skewers, remember to soak them in water for 20 minutes beforehand.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper and cook to your desired doneness.  Enjoy!

Recipe adapted from Jeffrey Weiss’ Charcuteria: The Soul of Spain

Thanks for visiting Relishing It today!

Laurie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rye Soda Bread with Dill Butter | Relishing It

I have to confess, I didn’t grow up eating soda bread.  Instead, my mother always had those huge tupperware containers filled with bread dough, covered with a white dishtowel, strategically placed near the warm registers of our farmhouse so it would rise.  But some time in my 20’s I discovered this fantastic alternative to the yeasted bread.  It doesn’t require any time at all to rise, which makes it nice for those spur of the moment meals when you would like to serve a loaf of warm bread, but just don’t have the time to mix up a batch of regular dough.  It’s easy to mix together– much like that of mixing scones.

Rye Soda Bread with Dill Butter | Relishing It

Soda bread is somewhat dense and can be made into something deliciously sweet or savory.  More common Irish soda bread is sweet and laced with raisins.  And though I love that, I gravitate towards the savory variety.  I love  combining rye and white whole wheat together in a bread.  The white whole wheat gives it a lighter texture, and the rye has a remarkable flavor.  It is a simple, hearty bread that is waiting to be smothered with a delicious spread.

Rye Soda Bread with Dill Butter | Relishing It

For this batch, I decided to use dill butter.  For some reason, it doesn’t seem fashionable to love dill anymore.  I’m not sure why, but all the other herbs are getting the attention lately.  I’m still in the dill camp, though, and always will be.  There is something so fresh and bright about it’s scent and flavor.  I pair it with shallots, garlic, and lemon zest for this compound butter and it is truly amazing.  Simple delicious food– the way it should be.  For something even more delectable, make your own homemade cultured butter!

Rye Soda Bread with Dill Butter | Relishing It

St. Patrick’s Day is just around the corner and I think this soda bread would be a lovely addition to your meal.  Double the recipe for the butter and you can use it on your boiled potatoes!  You still have time to gather your ingredients and start a brine if you plan to make homemade corned beef.  Bake up a batch of these fantastic mint grasshopper bars for dessert.  And of course, I hope you wash it all down with a pint of ale.  Cheers, friends!

Rye Soda Bread with Dill Butter | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Rye Soda Bread with Dill Butter

(serves 4-6)

For the Rye Bread:

1 cup rye flour (5 ounces)

1 cup white whole wheat flour (5 ounces)

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon granulated sugar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

4 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter (grated with the large holes of a box grater, if frozen OR cut into small cubes and use a pastry blender or fork, if cold)

3/4 cup buttermilk  (3/4 cup regular milk mixed with 2 teaspoons white vinegar can be substituted if you don’t have buttermilk)

For the Dill Butter:

4 tablespoons unsalted sweet cream butter at room temperature

1 clove garlic, finely minced

1 tablespoon finely minced fresh dill

zest of one small organic lemon

1/2 tablespoon finely minced shallot

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 egg mixed with 1 teaspoon water, for egg wash

1 teaspoon poppyseeds, for sprinkling on top

Preheat oven to 375°F.  Place the rack in the middle position of the oven.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.  Set aside.

To make the butter:  In a medium bowl combine the softened butter, garlic, dill, lemon zest, shallot and kosher salt.  Set aside to let the flavors develop.

In a large bowl, whisk together the rye flour, white whole wheat flour, baking soda, salt, and sugar.  I prefer to use frozen, grated butter.  Mix together using your hands, being careful to cover all of the butter with the flour mixture.  If using cold, cubed butter– use a pastry blender or fork to incorporate the butter into the flour.  You are looking for a result of pea-sized pieces.  Then, using a fork, mix in the buttermilk until the mixture is wet.  Using your hands, knead the dough a few times in the bowl until it is uniform.  Form the dough into a 6-inch flattened circle. Place the dough on the lined baking sheet and score it with a large “X” in the middle using a sharp knife or razor blade.  Make it about 1/2″-3/4″ deep.  Using a pastry brush, apply the egg wash and then sprinkle with poppyseeds.  Bake for about 30-32 minutes, or until it is golden brown and the center looks done.  Remove from oven and let cool on a cooling rack.  The bread will keep well for a couple days in an airtight container, but is best eaten the first day.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

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Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette | Relishing It

Autumn.  The best of all the seasons, even if it’s only brief here in Minnesota.  Yes, Spring is a close second, but when Autumn rolls around, I’m really, truly happy.  I love the brilliantly colored, crisp, maple leaves that my daughter brings me as bouquets for our dining room.  We live in an old Victorian with dark wood and decor in our living and dining rooms.  I always think about re-painting to brighten things up, but when Fall rolls around, it feels so comfortably warm and cozy, and I’m thankful I haven’t changed a thing.

Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette | Relishing It

Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette | Relishing It

Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette | Relishing It

Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette | Relishing It

On of my favorite Fall (and even winter, for that matter) dishes is this amazing Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette.  The combination of beef and sauerkraut is incredible.  It’s also a bit nostalgic for me.  I grew up with huge pots of meatballs that had been simmering in tangy sauerkraut for hours.  Wonderful stuff.  This galette showcases those flavors.  Just like my other galettes, the crust is crisp and light.  The potatoes add substance, while the fresh mozzarella ensures that the dish is moist enough.  Of course, you can substitute another mild cheese, like grated regular mozzarella, if you like.  I really wanted the tang from the sauerkraut to be showcased here, rather that hidden underneath a more assertive cheese.  I’m planning to share with you all a quick sauerkraut recipe and technique very soon.   I really hope you give this galette a try– I think you’ll really enjoy it!

Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette

Use this pie crust recipe  (with 1/2 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary and 1/2 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme mixed into the dough)

1/2 pound ground beef

1/4 cup chopped white onion

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

black pepper

3/4 pound small steamed yellow potatoes, sliced

1/2 cup sauerkraut, drained a bit

6 slices of fresh mozzarella  (or a bit more)

1 teaspoon fresh chopped parsley, plus more for garnish

olive oil

1 egg mixed with 1 teaspoon water, for an egg wash

Follow these directions to make the pie dough.  You will only be using one of the dough balls for this recipe.  Freeze the other one for another time.  Add the fresh herbs when you are mixing the dough.  Refrigerate for 2 hours.  Proceed.

Preheat your oven to 375°F.

In a large skillet, brown the ground beef over medium/high heat.  Drain and discard the grease.  To the skillet of ground beef add the chopped onions, garlic, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and a bit of black pepper (you may want to add a glug or two of olive oil, if the pan seems a little dry). Sauté for a couple of minutes until the onions are tender.  Remove from heat and set aside.

On a lightly floured piece of parchment paper, roll the pie dough out to a 12-inch circle using a lightly floured rolling pin.  Place the sliced potatoes on the dough, leaving about 1 1/2-inch space around the edge.  Sprinkle salt and pepper on the potatoes.  Next, put the sauerkraut on top, followed by the chopped parsley.  Then add the ground beef mixture, and finally place the fresh mozzarella on the very top.  Fold the edges of the dough up and pinch together to seal the seams as much as possible.  Use a pastry brush to apply the egg wash to the edge of the dough.  Sprinkle salt and pepper on the egg wash.

Slide the parchment paper with the galette onto a baking sheet and bake for 43-45 minutes or until the crust is a deep golden brown.  (Keep in mind that every oven is a bit different.  If you don’t already have an oven thermometer, I highly recommend you get one.  Cheap ones are about $7 and work great.  My oven runs 15 degrees hot.)  Top the galette with chopped parsley and a drizzle of olive oil before serving.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It today!

xo

Laurie

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Orecchiette with Sausage, Broccoli, and Sun-Dried Tomatoes | Relishing It

As much as I love to dabble in the kitchen all day long, I admit that there are days when our family is busy or I just don’t feel like dedicating  that much time to dinner.  The problem is, I don’t like to fall back on some overly-processed meal-in-a-box as the alternative.  Sound familiar?  I’ve found that it’s helpful to have a few quick, delicious dishes up my sleeve, and in talking with friends and family I’ve come to realize that I need to blog more about those types of meals.  If you need a little inspiration, I hope you find it in a few of the coming recipes for quick meals that I’ll be writing about throughout the winter.

Orecchiette with Sausage, Broccoli, and Sun-Dried Tomatoes | Relishing It

This orecchiette with sausage, broccoli, and sun-dried tomatoes, takes barely any time at all.  Maybe 30 minutes to get it on the table, if even.  I love to load a meal up with a healthy vegetable– the broccoli (or broccoli rabe, if you prefer) is just lovely in this dish.  Pairing it with sweet italian sausage is always a good decision.  Make sure to buy a good sweet italian sausage– we get ours locally and the spices are amazing!  And remember all of those sun-dried tomatoes I’ve been making?  The ones I put in a jar of olive oil are absolutely sublime in here.  If you didn’t dedicate the time to preparing your own, you can always buy a jar at your local market.  I like to kick this dish up with a few sprinkles of red pepper flakes and some freshly grated parmesan.  So, even if you’re pressed for time, I hope you can sit down and enjoy a delicious home-cooked meal.  Enjoy!

Orecchiette with Sausage, Broccoli, and Sun-Dried Tomatoes | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Orecchiette with Sausage, Broccoli, and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

(serves 4)

1 pound sweet Italian sausage

1 large head broccoli, cut into small florets (around 4 1/2 cups)

1/2 pound dried orecchiette

4 garlic cloves, minced

1/4 – 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil  (or substitute part of it with the olive oil from sun-dried tomatoes, if you can spare any)

1/3  cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil

1/3 cup (or more) parmesan cheese, for garnish

red pepper flakes, for garnish

Fill a large saucepan with water and bring to a boil.

In a large 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat, brown the sweet italian sausage.  Drain grease.  Meanwhile, cook the pasta.  To the skillet add the olive oil (if you can spare any from the sun-dried tomatoes, the flavor is incredible), garlic, and broccoli and cook until the broccoli is tender, but not mushy– about 5 minutes.  When the pasta is al dente (follow the cooking instructions), reserve a bit of the water, and drain the rest.  Add the hot pasta to the pan of sausage and broccoli.  Toss in the sun-dried tomatoes.  If more moisture is needed, either loosen with more olive oil, or a bit of pasta water.  Salt and pepper, as needed.  This is big– don’t forget the salt!  Top with parmesan cheese and red pepper flakes.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

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Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

In case you haven’t caught on yet, I’m a huge advocate of having a pantry stuffed with dried goods.  Legumes, grains, you name it, I’ve got it in a mason jar ready for use.  And on those occasions when I notice it isn’t stocked full, I briefly panic and then run out to replenish whatever is missing.  I guess it’s almost a compulsion, since it’s not like I’m going to not have access to food– I live a few blocks from our co-op.  I may be a little crazy, but I embrace it.

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

Summer is a great time to combine those dried goods with some of the season’s freshest offerings.  I love the combination of peas and pesto.  Using dried yellow and green split peas here works beautifully and is absolutely stunning to look at.  The sliced scallion on top provides a nice crunch and a burst of freshness.  This salad is also very filling– it’s one of those that can be a stand-alone meal.  And with a smaller portion size, it pairs wonderfully with most any grilled foods.

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

About this time of year, I also start to make large batches of pesto to freeze for the winter.  I’ll pop a small portion into ice cube trays or muffin tins to fully freeze.  I then pop them out, wrap them in plastic wrap, and put them into freezer bags (or use my vacuum sealer).  It’s a wonderful treat in the cold winter months to have pesto to mix into pasta or to dollop into soups.  If you choose to do this– a word of advice.  If you blanch your greens for just 30 seconds or so, then put it into an ice bath to stop the cooking process and proceed with the recipe–your pesto will remain a beautiful, vibrant green, even after it has been frozen.  I always use this method if I’m planning to freeze my pesto, or even if I know I’m going to have leftovers that may sit in my refrigerator for a few days.  The color just ‘pops’.  One more trick regarding pesto, remember you have the option to add a bit of water instead of more olive oil to loosen it up if it’s a bit thick.  Either way, be sure to season it appropriately with kosher salt– the right amount can make the pesto sing!  Enjoy!

Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto via Relishing It

The Recipe: Salad of Green and Yellow Split Peas with Pesto

(serves 4-6)

Large bed of leafy lettuce leaves

1 cup dried green split peas

1 cup dried yellow split peas

1 bunch of sliced scallions to garnish

For the Pesto:

1 cup packed basil leaves

1/4 cup packed Italian leaf parsley

3 cloves garlic, smashed

1/4 cup grated parmesan or grana padano cheese

1/4 cup walnut halves, toasted and roughly chopped

1/3 – 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, or more

sprinkle of hot pepper flakes

kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

To cook the Split Peas:  Rinse the peas and place in a large saucepan.  Cover with salted water, making sure that about two inches of water are above the peas.  Bring to a boil, then reduce to a medium/low.  Cook for about 25 minutes, then begin testing them for doneness.  You may need to cook them longer, depending upon how high your heat was.  You will want them to be soft, but retain their shape.  Be careful not to overcook them, or they will turn to mush.  When done, drain the water and let cool.

To make the Pesto:  As I stated above, you can choose to blanch the greens or not, depending upon how fast you’re going to use the pesto.  You decide.  Place either the blanched or unblanched basil and parsley into a small food processor (use a large one, if making a bigger batch).  Pulse a few times to chop up a bit.  Add the parmesan, walnuts, garlic, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt and pepper.  Pulse a couple more times to combine.  With the machine running on low, slowly begin adding the olive oil.  Scrape down the sides, as necessary.  Add as much olive oil to reach your desired consistency.  Or, add a few tablespoons of water at the very end to loosen it up a bit.  Re-season with salt and pepper.  Use right away, or place in the refrigerator with plastic wrap tightly pushed onto it’s surface, or freeze.

Place the lettuce leave onto a large platter.  Mix the cooled split peas with about 1/3 cup of the pesto, use more if desired.  Add salt and pepper, if needed.  Pour mixture over the lettuce, top with sliced scallions, and a drizzle of good olive oil.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by today!

xo

Laurie

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Carnitas Tacos and Fresh Tomatillo Salsa via Relishing It

I’m now well into my sixth month of being obsessed with tacos.  Seriously, we’ve been eating them at least once a week for more than a half year, and I’m not even close to getting sick of them.  Tacos al pastor?  Sure.   Spicy shredded beef?  Yes.  And then there are these amazing carnitas tacos that we’ve been enjoying.  They’re perfect to prepare in advance (and I live for meals like this in the summer), they’re healthy (if you don’t go overboard), and they’re oh so tasty.

Carnitas Tacos and Fresh Tomatillo Salsa via Relishing It

Carnitas Tacos and Fresh Tomatillo Salsa via Relishing It

Carnitas Tacos and Fresh Tomatillo Salsa via Relishing It

Carnitas, or “little meats”, can be served simply as a stand-alone dish, but I love it in these tacos even more.  It’s a new addition to my repetoire, which also includes these, and these— both of which are also favorites.  This carnitas version combines the lively flavors of lime and orange, which pair beautifully with pork, cumin, and garlic.  The recipe couldn’t be simpler–  you can make it on the stovetop.  Perfect for when firing up the oven in the summer heat doesn’t sound so tantalizing.  Put all of the ingredients into a pot, no sautéing required.  When cutting your pork shoulder up into cubes, don’t trim off any fat– you’re going to need that so the meat doesn’t get dry.  Let it cook down for about 2 hours and then sear the pork at the end.  That’s it.  Did I mention that it’s completely delicious?

Fresh Tomatillo Salsa via Relishing It

Carnitas Tacos and Fresh Tomatillo Salsa via Relishing It

The fresh tomatillo salsa is a fantastic compliment to the carnitas.  You may be tempted to buy a ready-made salsa from the store, but don’t.  The freshness of this topping cannot be bottled and you’ll end up spending more on a store-bought version that pales in comparison.  It only takes a minute to either chop or pulse the ingredients together– definitely worth your time.  And as far as toppings go, I’m stuck on queso fresco cheese, white onions, and cilantro.  The combination is sublime and it tastes so fresh.  Hope you enjoy them as much as my family does.

Carnitas Tacos and Fresh Tomatillo Salsa via Relishing It

The Recipe: Carnitas Tacos and Fresh Tomatillo Salsa

For the Carnitas:

4 pounds boneless pork shoulder, cut into 2-inch cubes (do not trim the fat)

2/3 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (about 3 oranges)

1/3 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (about 3 limes)

1 1/2 teaspoon cumin seed, toasted then ground

2 teaspoons kosher salt

6-7 garlic cloves, chopped

Corn tortillas, queso fresco cheese, limes, cilantro, and white onions for toppings

For the Tomatillo Salsa:

4 tomatillos

1/2 medium white onion

4 garlic cloves

1 jalapeño

small handful of cilantro (around 1/3 cup)

juice of 1 lime

kosher salt

To make the Carnitas:  Place all of the ingredients into a large Dutch oven.  Add enough water to just cover the pork.  Bring to a boil, then simmer the pork uncovered for about 2 hours.  Do not touch the pork.  Let it do it’s thing.  After 2 hours, bring the heat up to medium/high and begin reducing the liquid for about the next 45 minutes.  When the liquid is mostly gone, sear all the sides of the pork pieces.  They will be tender and practically fall apart.  Keep a watchful eye at this point, as you don’t want them to burn.

To make the Tomatillo Salsa:  Rough chop the ingredients and place them into a food processor and give them a few pulses until the salsa is your desired consistency.  Alternatively, you can chop all of the ingredients by hand.  Make sure to season correctly with salt.

Source:  Carnitas recipe adapted from The Homesick Texan

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It today!

Laurie

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Cajun Red Beans and Brown Rice via Relishing ItWhile it is “technically” Spring, as I write this we’re in a winter storm warning here in Minnesota.  Yup, a quick glance out the kitchen window and all I see is a white, wind-blown blur.  So I guess it’s no surprise that my thoughts are still with warm, comfort foods.  I’m not really complaining though.  It’ll end eventually, to be followed by those dreaded days marked by 90 degree temperatures and shirt-drenching humidity.  Gross.  So, I really am quite happy nuzzling into a blanket while the snow falls.  Please stop throwing tomatoes at me.

Cajun Red Beans and Brown Rice via Relishing It

Cajun Red Beans and Brown Rice via Relishing It

These cajun red beans and brown rice are just the sort of warm, comfort food that I’m talking about.  They’re not fancy, but they’re loaded with flavor and are just different enough to add a little variety to your nightly meal routine.  They’re made from healthy, whole foods and thickened naturally from the starch in the beans.  The cajun flavor is delightful, though not too spicy.  The heat level can be adjusted by adding more cayenne pepper. Ham works perfectly in this dish, and not a lot is needed. It gives it a nice, smokey flavor– though, you can easily make this meal with andouille sausage or without any meat at all for a vegetarian option.  You may need to adjust the seasonings a bit, namely the salt, as the pork tends to add a decent amount of that.  I love making a big batch of these beans and sending the leftovers with my husband throughout the week.  Enjoy!

Cajun Red Beans and Brown Rice via Relishing It

The Recipe:  Cajun Red Beans and Brown Rice

2 cups red beans, soaked overnight with salt (or do the quick-soak method)

olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped

4 garlic cloves, chopped

1 green pepper, chopped

1 stalk of celery, diced

2 dried bay leaves

3 1/2 teaspoons sweet paprika

2 teaspoons fresh thyme, minced

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or more to taste

3 cups chicken broth

6 cups water

2 cups of cubed cooked ham (andouille sausage is a good substitute)

cracked black pepper, to taste

red wine vinegar

Diced green onion, cooked brown rice, and hot sauce for serving

Quick-soak method:  Place the beans in a large saucepan.  Add enough water and a large pinch of salt to cover the beans by about an inch.  Bring to a boil for 1 minute.  Remove from heat and leave covered for about 2 hours.  Proceed with the recipe at this point. 

In a large Dutch oven, heat a couple tablespoons of olive oil and sauté the green pepper, onion, celery, and garlic for a couple of minutes until tender.  Add the paprika, black pepper, cayenne pepper, bay leaves, and thyme and cook for about 1 minute.  Add the chicken broth, water, red beans, and cubed ham.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and cover.  Let simmer for about 1 hour.  Check along the way, turn the heat up a bit, if the beans are not softening.  The dish will be done when the beans are very tender and the sauce has thickened.  Finish with a splash of red wine vinegar.  Season with salt, if necessary, though the ham usually supplies enough.  Serve over hot brown rice and a generous sprinkling of green onions.  Enjoy!

Source:  Adapted from Cooks Illustrated Magazine

Hope you all have a fantastic weekend.  See you next week!

Laurie

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