Posts Tagged ‘Brunch’

One of the best smells in the world– especially on a weekend morning– has to be homemade caramel sticky buns baking in the oven.  The sweet scent of cinnamon wafting through the house, along with the earthy aroma of toasted pecans, is just… divine really.  Caramel sticky buns are one of my family’s favorite weekend treats, so a few years ago we began to scour the Twin Cities for the best ones.  We found a few gems, but more often than not, we were disappointed.  Many were too ‘bread-y’, others were covered in so much caramel that they were just a mess, and a few were hard, crunchy disasters.

Aside from returning to that handful of favorites that we did find, I decided to work on a version that was just right.  I try new sticky bun recipes all the time– I really do.  We’ve gone through a few that are really tasty, but this one is the best.  And it’s better than any we’ve found in local bakeries or cafe’s.  Honestly, it’s perfect.  It makes a nice tall bun that is soft and tender– not too dense– with a lightly-crunchy top.  The dough is soft, buttery, and very easy to work with.  It rolls out beautifully.

One interesting thing about this recipe is that the caramel is on the top and bottom of the roll.  This means you don’t invert the rolls when they’re finished.  Instead, you top them with another helping of caramel.  The result is an even distribution of the caramel throughout the roll.  It’s a simple difference, but it’s genius.

Another thing that makes these buns different from most recipes is that for the filling, you whip the butter along with the brown sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg (nutmeg makes everything better).  In most other versions, you just spread the butter and sprinkle on the spices.  It makes an amazing difference, so do not avoid this step.  You’re going to want to lick the mixture right off the spoon!

These buns are wonderful to prepare ahead of time.  You can do this a few ways.  First, the dough can be refrigerated (it needs to chill for at least to two hours before it can be rolled into buns, anyway).  Another option is to finish the buns, get them into the pan, and refrigerate overnight.  The rise time will be a bit longer (because the dough is cold), but it makes having a fresh sticky bun in the morning so much easier.  Finally, you can just make them the night before– including the baking– since these one’s stay soft and moist.  In the morning, just top them with the last of the caramel and toasted pecans.  Hope you enjoy these sticky buns as much as we do!

The Recipe:  Perfect Caramel Sticky Buns

(Makes 9)

For the Dough:

2/3 cup whole milk

5 tablespoons sugar, divided

1 3/4 teaspoon active dry yeast (from one 1/4-ounce envelope)

2 large eggs, at room temperature

2 3/4 cup (14 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter at room temperature, cut into 1-inch pieces, plus a bit more melted

For the Caramel Topping:

2 cups chopped pecans, toasted

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter

3/4 cup (packed) dark brown sugar

3/4 cup heavy cream

1/3 cup honey

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

For the Filling:

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/2 cup (packed) dark brown sugar

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

pinch of kosher salt

flour, for dusting

1 egg, for brushing on the buns

Sea salt

Prepare the dough by heating the milk in a saucepan or microwave until the temperature registers 110-115°F.  Mix in the yeast and 1 tablespoon of the granulated sugar.  Let it sit for 5 minutes to get foamy.  Add the eggs and whisk until smooth.  Add the remaining sugar, flour, and salt into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a hook attachment.  Give the mixture a quick stir with a whisk, then add the wet ingredients.  Turn the machine on and mix until it’s a shaggy mess.  Add the butter, one chunk at a time, making sure to wait until each piece is mostly incorporated.  When everything is incorporated, knead the dough on medium  for about 5 minutes.  The dough should be soft and silky.  Place the dough into a large bowl that has been lightly coated with melted butter.  Pour a bit more of the melted butter on top of the dough and spread evenly with your hands.  Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or up to 1 day.

Toast the pecans by placing them on a baking sheet in a 350°F oven for 10-12 minutes, or until fragrant.  Let cool.

Prepare the caramel by melting the butter in a small saucepan.  Add the brown sugar, cream, honey, and salt.  Bring to a boil and reduce heat to medium.  Let continue to cook for about 3-4 minutes.  The glaze will be a deep golden brown.  Pour one cup of the glaze into an 8×8-inch pan.  Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the toasted pecans over the glaze.  Reserve the remaining glaze (refrigerate with a cover, if using much later).  Note: I’ve made these rolls by lining the pan with parchment paper so they could be easily removed and placed on a platter.  It also works just as easily to put them into the pan with nothing at all — the choice is yours.

Prepare the filling by placing the butter, cinnamon, salt, brown sugar, and nutmeg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix for 2-3 minutes, or until light and fluffy.  Set aside.

Form the buns by putting a light coat of flour down on a work surface.  Roll the chilled dough into a 12 x 16-inch rectangle.  Spread the butter/spice mixture on it, leaving a 1-inch plain border on the side furthest away from you.  Sprinkle 3/4 cup of the pecans over the butter (reserve the remaining pecans — put into an airtight container, if using much later).  Roll the dough into a tight log.  Cut and discard the very edges, if they are uneven.  Cut the remaining dough into 9 equal pieces.  Re-shape if they flatten out in the cutting process.  Place them in the pan and cover with plastic wrap or a light kitchen towel.  Let rise in a warm, draft-free area for about 45 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size ( 1 1/2 – 2 hours, if the dough has been chilled overnight).

After the buns have properly raised, whisk the egg with 1/2 teaspoon of water and brush onto the buns.  Place the pan of buns on a baking sheet and put into a 350°F oven and bake for about 50 minutes, or until a thermometer registers 185°F in the center.    Remove from oven and let cool for a bit.  Pour remaining glaze on the buns and top with the pecans.  Sprinkle with sea salt and enjoy with a hot cup of coffee.

Source:  Adapted from Bon Appetite

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A quick stroll through my dessert and cookie sections pretty much confirms that I have an insatiable sweet tooth.  Even so, when we go to our near-by patisserie, I choose a savory bite almost every time.  And if they’ve made a savory tartlet, my decision is easy.  Thankfully, I now have a recipe to make these little beauties at home– and this is one of the best tartlets I’ve ever had.

This wonderful, firm but flakey crust is made from olive oil rather than butter.  It lends a light floral, almost earthy, quality to the dish. Even though it is not par-baked, the crust becomes perfectly crispy on the outside, yet is still substantial enough to hold up to the liquid center.  Even after days in the refrigerator, the crust has an excellent texture.  And you know what that means– this is a great dish to make ahead of time.

The savory filling contains ramps, gouda, and goat cheese.  That’s right, it’s ramp season.  Remember last year when I was so excited and made this ramp pesto?  Well, I’m just as excited this year– and Radd is again making fun of the fact that I talk about ramps far too much.  If you don’t recall, or are unfamiliar with them, ramps are basically a wild leek.  They taste a bit like green onions combined with garlic.  If you find them, buy and enjoy them right away.  They’re not in season for long.  If you can’t find ramps, substitute green onions or leeks with a couple cloves of garlic.  It will still taste amazing.  I love the combination of ramps and goat cheese, and in this dish it really shines.  The goat cheese is soft and pillowy as you bite into the tartlet, while the gouda melts into the creamy center.  Enjoy!

The Recipe:  Ramp and Goat Cheese Tartlets

(Makes six 4-inch tarts or one 9 – 10-inch tart)

For the Savory Tart Dough:

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 cup white whole wheat flour

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

1/4 cup olive oil

For the Tart Filling:

about 1  1/4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled

about 1  1/2 ounces gouda, grated

3 ramps, chopped (about 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon)

4 eggs

1/4 cup heavy whipping cream

kosher salt and black pepper, to taste

To make the Savory Tart Dough:  Place both flours, salt, and sugar in a food processor and pulse a few times to combine.  Add the eggs and olive oil and pulse about 10-15 times until the dough forms a ball.  Remove dough and place on a lightly floured work surface.  Knead  3-4 times, careful not to over work the dough.  Wrap in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.   Can be made ahead and kept in the refrigerator for up to 2 days or frozen.  The dough will defrost quickly at room temperature when you are ready to use it.

Preheat oven to 400°F.  Position rack in the center of the oven.  If making tartlets, measure out the dough into 6 equal portions, about 1  7/8 ounces each.  Roll the dough in a circle 1-inch larger than the tartlet pan or just press the dough evenly into the pans.  Distribute the goat cheese, gouda, and ramps evenly between the 6 pans.  In a small bowl, combine the eggs and cream and pour over each of the tarts, careful not to over fill them.

Place tartlets on a baking sheet and put into the oven.  Bake for about 35 minutes, or until the crust is a deep golden brown and the filling is puffed and becoming golden brown, as well.  Serve the tartlets warm or at room temperature.  They keep well for about 3 days in a covered container in the refrigerator and can be reheated in a 350°F oven.  Serve with a dollop of creme fraiche, if desired. Enjoy!

Source:  Olive Oil Crust adapted from Nick Malgieri’s How to Bake

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Ahhh…citrus in Spring.  Fresh, vibrant, and beautiful.  You already know that I’m a sucker for pretty much anything citrus-related– just take a look at these and this… and these… and this…and this..and these…and these…and this…  Wow!  I didn’t realize I was that big of a sucker for citrus!  Well, you get the point.  Another great way to indulge in these brilliant fruits is by making curd.  I know, the name doesn’t sound very appealing, but think of it more as a silky, citrus pudding.  Much better.

Today’s dish relies on my favorite citrus curd recipe.  It’s foolproof.  You can use any type of citrus (lemon, grapefruit, and lime work too!), and it’ll turn out perfect every time.  Personally, I love lemon curd the best, but Radd is a big fan of orange, so this batch was for him.

One of the best things about curd is that it’s so versatile.  It’s a great topping for shortbread or toast.  I often fill white cupcakes with it and top them with a beautiful meringue frosting.  And of course, it is perfect paired with classic scones, the second recipe for today’s dish.  You know the kind I’m referring to– the one’s that aren’t fussy or fancy.  The ones that go with anything.  Jam and clotted cream, anyone?  Spread a little fresh citrus curd on a scone, pour a cup of coffee, and take in the Spring morning.  Perfect.

The Recipe: Orange Curd with Classic Scones

Orange Curd

6 tablespoons (3 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup granulated sugar

2 large eggs

2 large egg yolks

2/3 cup fresh orange juice

2 teaspoons grated orange zest

In a small bowl, combine the eggs and egg yolks and lightly beat, set aside.  In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, add the butter and sugar.  Beat for about 2 minutes.  Slowly add the eggs.  Beat for 1 minute.  Pour in the orange juice and continue to mix.  The mixture will look curdled — this is fine, it will smooth out as it cooks.

In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan, cook the mixture over low heat until it begins to look smooth.  The curdled appearance will disappear as the butter melts.  Increase the heat to medium and cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens, between 10-15 minutes.  It should leave a path on the back of a spoon and a thermometer should read 170°F.  Do not let the mixture boil.

Remove from heat.  Stir in the orange zest.  Transfer to a bowl and place plastic wrap against the curd to keep a skin from forming.  Place in the refrigerator.  The curd will thicken as it chills.  It will last in the refrigerator covered for 1 week or frozen for up to 2 months.


Classic Scones

(Makes 8-10 scones)

2 cups unbleached cake flour (11 ounces), plus more as needed

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

3 tablespoons turbinado sugar (or anything coarse), divided

5 tablespoons cold butter, cut into pieces

1 egg, lightly beaten

1/2 – 3/4- cup heavy cream, plus more for brushing

Preheat oven to 450°F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.  Add the flour, salt, baking powder, and 2 tablespoons of the sugar into a food processor.  Pulse a few times to combine.  Add the butter, and pulse a few more times until the mixture resembles cornmeal.  Medium chunks of butter are just fine.

Add the egg and enough of the cream to form a slightly sticky dough.  It should stick to your hands a bit, but shouldn’t be overly wet.  Adjust cream/ flour as necessary.

Remove dough from food processor and place on a lightly floured surface.  With flour on your hands, pat dough into a flat 3/4-inch thick circle.  Use a round 2-inch biscuit cutter to cut out scones.  Place them on the baking sheet.  Brush with cream and sprinkle with remaining sugar.  Bake for 9-11 minutes, or until they are golden brown.

Source: Scones adapted from the New York Times.  Orange curd adapted from Fine Cooking

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!  Hope you all have a wonderful weekend.


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I know, I’ve made another dish with a fancy French word.  Well, I’ve found that a good rule is,  if it comes from French food culture it’s going to be good.  Mollet eggs (rhymes with Olé) are wonderfully soft eggs with a firm egg-white, and a beautiful oozy center.  They’re not what we would generally call a soft egg, with it’s more liquid albumin.  I’ve been obsessed with these eggs for the last two months.  By obsessed, I mean I’ve eaten at least one for breakfast or lunch almost every day.  And can I just mention how brilliant they are this time of year!  If you’re using organic, free-range chicken eggs, you’ll see the yolks are almost orange right now, as the birds get out and take in those nutritients.  Happy chickens means a happy me.  I’ll put an egg on most anything.  “Put an egg on it!” is my “Put a bird on it!”.  (Portlandia anyone?)

I don’t always like to use oil when I prepare eggs, so that leaves me with the options of either hard-boiled (which I make often) or poached.  And more often than not, I’m too lazy to poach them.  I’ve found that mollet eggs are the perfect solution.  This technique, which I first saw used by that French culinary sage, Jacques Pepin, is foolproof.  First, bring a saucepan of water to a boil.  Use a pin or thumbtack to poke a hole into the largest end of the egg.  This hole prevents the egg shell from cracking while it’s cooking.  Boil the eggs for six minutes and then pour out the water.  Shake the pan to crack the shells a bit.  Finally, peel the eggs under cold, running water.  The water gets under the shell and membrane, causing it to slough off without taking any of the firm egg-white.  The egg is perfect every time.

Now the egg is only part of this breakfast dish.  We love hash– the perfect big breakfast to start the weekend.  It’s even better when you have friends come over to enjoy it with.  I make the pork shoulder in a crock pot, though of course you can just use your oven and braise the pork shoulder if you like.  One of the things I love about this meal is that most of it can be made in advance.  Much of the morning can be spent visiting and sipping on a cup of French-press coffee.  I love being able to make most of this meal ahead of time,  it makes the morning so much more relaxing.  And even better, the leftovers (if you somehow have any) heat up very well, and make a fine lunch.  Here’s to your next weekend breakfast!

The Recipe: Mollet Eggs with Pork Shoulder Hash

(serves 6 comfortably)

4 tablespoons olive oil

6 cloves garlic

2 sprigs rosemary

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1/2 – 3/4 cup water

1 large white onion, chopped, plus another 1/2 onion

3 pounds organic fingerling potatoes, steamed, then diced

3 celery ribs, chopped

2 pounds pork shoulder

1/4 cup chopped fresh chives

6 organic eggs, or more

kosher salt and fresh black pepper

To make the pork shoulder:  The night before you plan to serve it, place the pork shoulder seasoned with kosher salt and fresh black pepper, 1/2 white onion cut into chunks, garlic cloves, 1 rosemary sprig, thyme, and 1/2 cup of water (or a bit more, if you see fit) into a crock pot set at low.  Leave on overnight.  In the morning, remove the meat and and shred it with two forks, discarding any fat. Add the soft garlic cloves to the meat.  Set aside.

Prepare the potatoes the night before, as well.  Add the potatoes to a large saucepan with a steamer inserted into it.  Set the heat to medium-high and cover with a lid.  If they don’t all fit into your pan, steam them in two batches.  Steam for 10-15 minutes, depending upon the size of your potatoes, or until a knife inserted into them goes in with ease.  Let cool and place them covered in the refrigerator overnight.  Dice them in the morning.

In the morning,  heat a large skillet (mine is 14-inches) to medium-high heat.  Add the olive oil and then sauté the onion until it develops a nice golden color, about 5-7 minutes.  Add the celery and sauté until it softens a bit.  Sprinkle kosher salt and fresh black pepper into the pan.  Add the diced potatoes and cook until they are heated through and have developed a bit of a golden color to them.  Add the shredded pork shoulder to the pan and continue to sauté until everything is hot.  Re-season, if necessary.  Sprinkle with chives and chop up the remaining rosemary sprig and add that, as well.

 Meanwhile, while the potatoes are cooking, bring a medium saucepan filled with water to a boil.  When the potatoes are on the verge of being done, gently push a pin or thumbtack  into the large end of each of the eggs.  Gently lower them into the boiling water.  Reduce the heat to a small boil.  Set a timer for six minutes.  When the timer goes off, remove from heat.  Drain the hot water into sink leaving the eggs in the pan.  Gently, but with a bit of force, shake the pan back and forth, so that the eggs crack a bit.  Run some cold water and begin to peel the eggs underneath it.  It is important to get the water under the shell and the membrane.  Once that occurs, peeling the egg will be a cinch.  Dry the eggs on a paper towel.

Have the pork shoulder hash plated and place one egg (or more) on the top.  Cut into the egg and enjoy the golden yolk oozing all over the crisp potatoes and pork shoulder.  Enjoy!

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For the last few weeks, I’ve been obsessed with kumquats.  I’ve been blending them to make salad dressing, slicing them thin as a salad topper, and making this delicious marmalade.  For those of you who haven’t tasted a kumquat, they are quite tart.  I guess the best way to describe their flavor is like a cross between an orange and a lemon– with the emphasis on the orange-like qualities.  And they’re perfect for this citrus-obsessed girl.   I almost decided not to share this recipe, since it’s hardly a recipe at all.  I thought it might be ridiculous to write about something made from just three ingredients– one of them being water.  But I kept on making batch after batch of this amazing marmalade, and eventually figured I had to share it.

I’ve been enjoying this marmalade on sandwiches with brie and arugula.  Sometimes I even throw a piece of bacon on top, because bacon goes with everything (I know we’ve already established this).  It’s true though.  The salty bacon works so beautifully with the sweet, yet tart flavors of the marmalade.  Sometimes, for a little added punch, I like to sprinkle some red pepper flakes on top.  And aside from brie, this topping goes well with both ricotta and goat cheeses.  Fresh herbs, such as thyme or rosemary, are also great additions.  Come to think of it, I may even throw a sprig or two into the next batch.  It would make a dramatic topping for a rich vanilla cheesecake…with a bit of rosemary for garnish!

The most time-consuming part is slicing all of the kumquats, but after that it’s smooth sailing.  The recipe here is for one jar, but I usually increase the ingredients to make four or five at a time.  Since I love to give homemade things away for little gifts, I’ve been using the larger batches for that purpose.  It’s like giving a little jar of sunshine.  Make some of this fabulous marmalade, give some away.  It’ll make you happy.  I promise.

The Recipe:  Kumquat Marmalade

(Makes enough for an 8 ounce jam jar)

15 Kumquats

3/4 cup granulated sugar OR 1/3 cup honey (both versions are equally delicious!)

1/2 cup water

To make the marmalade, wash the kumquats.  Slice them as thin as as you can — peelings and all.  Carefully remove the seeds, as you come across them.  In a small heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat add the kumquats, sugar or honey,  and water.  Sir with a wooden spoon.  As you do this more tiny seeds may float to the top of the water — remove them with the spoon. Bring to a boil, then immediately reduce the heat to an aggressive simmer.  Cover with the lid and stir frequently.  After about 30 minutes the kumquats should be tender, though it may happen sooner depending upon your heat level.   Remove the lid, raise the heat, and let cook a bit longer until the mixture becomes your desired consistency.  About another 15-20 minutes is where I like mine, though it will depend on how high your heat was.  Keep in mind that it won’t completely thicken until it is chilled in the refrigerator.   Remove from the heat and let cool a bit in the pan before you pour it into your sanitized jam jar.  Put into the refrigerator to chill.  It will keep for about a month — though it will be long gone before then.

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!  Have a great weekend.


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I distinctly remember the first time I ate a piece of chocolate babka bread.  It floored me.  I had a hard time wrapping my brain around the fact that it looked so sweet– like a dessert bread– but instead had so much more flavorful depth.  Those simple swirls wrapped around chunks of bittersweet chocolate were amazing.  And though it wasn’t what I was expecting, I loved it.  I was hooked.  Since that first piece, I’ve ordered chocolate babka whenever I’ve had the opportunity.  Some have been amazing, while others just didn’t quite get it right.

For today’s recipe, I’ve found a babka that definitely gets it right.  Being able to make something at home that is just as good, if not better, than the versions I’ve tried elsewhere is one of the most satisfying things about cooking and baking.  And this babka ranks right up there with the best I’ve ever eaten.  The bread is moist and soft, and of course, not overly sweet.  I love the big chunks of chocolate and the subtle kiss of cinnamon that make every bite interesting.  In a word, it’s perfect.

This babka is not difficult to make, and I think the pictures should help you visualize each step.  As always, fancy equipment is not necessary.  Every step can be done by hand, though it’ll take a bit longer to mix and knead the dough.  The results are worth the little added effort.  This babka begs to be eaten while sipping a cup of coffee and chatting with a good friend.  I hope you make this one, you’ll be so happy you did!

The Recipe: Chocolate Babka

For the Bread:

2 1/4 teaspoons (one 1/4-ounce envelope) active dry yeast

1/4 cup granulated sugar

3/4 cup warm milk (110 degrees)

1 large egg plus one large egg yolk

3 cups (15 ounces) all-purpose flour, plus more for surface

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter at room temperature, plus more for bowl and pan

1 large egg, lightly beaten with 1 tablespoon heavy cream, for egg wash

For the Filling:

8 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped (1 1/4 cups)

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into small pieces

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

For the Crumb Topping:

1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature

To make the bread: In a medium bowl, sprinkle the yeast and a pinch of sugar over the milk and let stand for about 5 minutes, or until foamy.  In another bowl, whisk together the remaining sugar, the egg and the yolk.  Whisk into the yeast mixture.  In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour and kosher salt.  Add the egg mixture and mix on low speed until almost fully combined, about 30 seconds.  Switch to the dough-hook attachment, and add the butter.  Mix until smooth, soft, and slightly sticky, about 9-10 minutes.  Butter a large bowl.  Turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead a few times until smooth.  Place in bowl and cover with plastic wrap.  Let stand in a warm place until doubled in size, roughly 1- 1 1/2 hours or longer (it will depend upon how warm your house is).

Meanwhile, make the chocolate filling.  In a medium bowl, combine the chocolate chunks, sugar, cinnamon, and salt.  Cut in the butter with a fork, pastry cutter, or my favorite way, your fingers, until combined.

Once the dough has doubled in size, punch it down.  Place it on a flour work surface.  Let rest for 5 minutes and then roll it out into a 18-inch square.  Reserve a 1/2 cup of the filling and sprinkle the rest over the dough, leaving a 1-inch border.  Brush the edges with the egg wash.  Tightly roll the dough from one end to the other, like a jelly roll.  Pinch the seam to seal.  Fold in half and form a “U” shape.  Twist 2 or 3 times to “braid”.  Make sure to pinch the ends of braid together, as well.  Butter a 5-by-10-inch loaf pan, line with parchment, leaving 1-inch overhangs; then butter the parchment paper.  Place the dough in the pan and brush with egg wash.

To make the crumb topping, in a small bowl combine the confectioners’ sugar, flour, and butter.  Mix with your finger until large, moist clumps form.  Sprinkle topping along with 1/2 cup reserved chocolate filling over the cake.  It’s ok if it falls down the sides of the cake, it will bake up beautifully.

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Drape plastic wrap over the dough.  Let rise in a warm place until risen by half, about 30 minutes.

Place bread pan on a cookie sheet, in case any of the topping tumbles off while baking.  Place in the oven (center rack).  Bake rotating halfway through, until golden, about 55 minutes.  Reduce oven temperature to 325°F.  Bake until deeply golden, about 15-20 minutes more (cover with foil if top gets too dark).  Transfer pan to wire rack to cool completely before removing from pan.  Bread can be stored in an airtight container (with plastic wrap placed on cut ends) for about 3 days.

Source:  Adapted from Martha Stewart Living, 2011

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It.  I’d love to hear about some of the foods you’ve been relishing in your life lately!


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This recipe blew me away!  How’s that for an opening?  When I read about these savory pancakes, I figured they’d be delicious– the flavors sounded like they really worked well together.  But I had no idea that they would meld into such a heavenly combination.  The first bite was, honestly, a revelation.

This dish comes from the amazing Yotam Ottolenghi.  He owns the highly-regarded Ottolenghi restaurant in London’s Notting Hill district.  This recipe can be found in his latest cookbook– devoted to vegetables– called Plenty.  Both the recipes and presentation are brilliant.  The photography, ingredients, and flavor combinations of his creations are an inspiration.

Aside from their incredible flavor, these pancakes are also a perfect way to get more greens into your day.  I used rainbow Swiss chard, along with green onions and cumin in the batter– they combine into a wonderful flavor.  But the real showstopper in this dish is the cilantro lime butter.  It is not subtle– more like a ‘flavor punch’ to your tastebuds.  You won’t need to use all of the butter on your pancakes, but you should make the entire amount. Once you taste it, you’ll see why.  I’m already thinking of other foods to put it on, like grilled sweet corn and sweet potatoes.  These pancakes make a fantastic star for any brunch menu, but work just as well for dinner, given their savory flavor.  Hope you enjoy them as much as we did.

The Recipe:  Savory Green Pancakes with Cilantro Lime Butter

Serves 3-4

Cilantro Lime Butter

8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, soft, but somewhat cold

grated zest of 1 lime

1 1/2 tablespoons lime juice

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped

1 clove garlic, finely minced

dash of chile flakes, to taste

Savory Green Pancakes

1/2 pound (8 ounces) Swiss Chard, washed, stems removed

3/4 cup self – rising flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 egg

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon ground cumin

2/3 cup milk (I used 2%)

5-6 medium green onions, finely sliced

1 fresh green chili, thinly sliced  (more if you prefer heat)

1 egg white

olive oil for frying

(Note: to make self-rising flour, combine 1 cup flour, 1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder, and a pinch of salt)

To make the cilantro lime butter: Place the somewhat chilled butter in a medium bowl (I liked working with the butter slightly chilled, because it was easy to roll into a log — it does take a little more muscle to get the ingredients mixed into it).  Mix in the rest of the ingredients until the butter mixture is creamy and uniform.  I formed the butter into a log using the wrapper from the butter,  you could also use plastic wrap and twist the ends of the wrap.  Chill until firm.

Wilt the Swiss chard in a hot frying pan with a splash of water.  Drain in a colander and when completely cool, squeeze out the remaining liquid using a paper towel or your hands.  Chop well and set aside.

Place the flour, baking powder, whole egg, melted butter, salt, cumin, and milk in a large mixing bowl and whisk until smooth.  Add the green onions, chiles, and Swiss Chard and combine with a spoon.  Whisk the egg white to soft peaks (I used my electric mixer, but you could do it by hand) and gently fold into the batter.

Pour a small amount of olive oil into a heavy frying pan and place on medium-high heat.  For each pancake, ladle 2 tablespoons of the batter into the pan.  These are meant to be small pancakes, about 3 inches in diameter and 3/8-inch thick.  Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until you get a beautiful golden color.   Enjoy with a small slice of the cilantro lime butter placed on each pancake.

Source:  Adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s Cookbook, Plenty

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