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Orange and Olive Oil Cake

Pretty much every time I walked into my Grandma Jesch’s home as a child, there was a newly-baked cake waiting for me.  And I stopped by to visit at least every other day.  I guess that’s likely the source of my infatuation with cake.  I love them.  I love every kind of cake.  I love big decadent cakes with billowing frosting.  And tarts loaded with pastry cream and topped with ripe summer berries, make me swoon.  But sometimes…sometimes I want a simple cake.  A snacking cake.  Like the ones my Grandma Jesch made.

This orange and olive oil cake is the perfect snacking cake.  It’s interesting and delicious, without being too glamorous.  The olive oil lets you know it’s in there, though it’s subtle.  It adds a slightly floral flavor that works wonderfully with the brightness of the orange zest.  The cake stays moist with the help of the olive oil and the yogurt; and in my experience, it’s better after sitting for a few hours or even overnight.  Be warned though, the modesty of this cake may deceive you.  Since it doesn’t have the pomp of a fancy chocolate layer cake, you won’t think of it as dessert.  Your guard will be down.  You’ll wander into the kitchen several times over the course of the afternoon, and suddenly, half of the cake will be gone.  Not that that happened to me.  And I certainly wouldn’t tell you if it did…

The Recipe:  Orange and Olive Oil Cake

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 teaspoon kosher salt

4 large eggs, separated

2 cups granulated sugar

1 cup plain yogurt

3/4 cup good-quality extra-virgin olive oil  (preferably something fruity, if possible)

zest of 3 oranges

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

confectioners’ sugar, for dusting

Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Place rack in the center of oven.  Generously spray the inside of a 10-inch Bundt pan with a nonstick cooking spray; or butter it well, flour it, and tap out any excess.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt.  Set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the egg yolks until they are pale and light; slowly pour in the sugar until it is completely incorporated.  Add the yogurt and olive oil and mix until thoroughly combined.  Add the orange zest and vanilla, mix until just incorporated.

Add the flour mixture to the wet ingredients in two parts, beating after each addition until just combined (it should only take 10 seconds).  Scrape down the bowl and beat again for 5 seconds.

In another large bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form.  Scoop 1 cup of the egg whites into the batter.  Use a rubber spatula to gently fold them in.  After about 30 seconds of folding, add the remaining egg whites and gently fold until they are almost completely combined.  Do not rush this process.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for 40-50 minute, rotating the pan half way through the baking time, or bake until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.  Transfer the pan to a wire rack to cool for 10-15 minutes.  Gently loosen the sides of the cake from the pan (an offset spatula works well) and turn out onto a rack to cool completely.  Dust with confectioners’ sugar right before serving.  This cake stores well at room temperature for about 3 days in a tightly covered container.  Enjoy!

Source: Adapted from Baked Explorations

Thanks for stopping by today!

Laurie

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If you happen to have gorged on too much of this dip from Friday’s post, have no fear.  Today it’s all about health food.  This light, fresh, kale salad is one of my favorites.  Kale is one of those all-important super foods that is loaded with vitamins and antioxidants.  Here is a little run-down on just how good it is for you.  Personally, I probably eat more kale than any other vegetable.  It’s such an important part of my daily diet, that I eat nearly one bunch per day– by myself.  We also make kale chips very often.  My three-year old loves them, and despite the fact that Radd jokes about ‘being forced to eat kale’, he likes them too.

I think the way people view kale has changed significantly in the last decade or so.  In college I worked for the university dining service.  I remember being told to put the kale all around the salad bar to make it look “pretty”.  It was never prepared for a meal, but strictly used as a garnish because it was green and firm.  I’m glad that we’ve moved past the “kale-as-a-garnish” phase.  It’s so delicious, and so good for you.

On to this fantastic salad.  If you haven’t eaten raw kale before, this Tuscan kale salad is a great place to start.  The salad really highlights the wonderful aspects of raw kale– though note that this salad really should only be made with Tuscan kale.  It’s the variety that is tender enough to still be edible uncooked.  The dressing is a perfect match.  I’ve made it with each of the three cheeses, listed below.  They all work wonderfully.  I love the fact that the cheese is mixed right into the dressing– it makes it a bit creamier.  Also, I tend to like things a little heavy on the garlic-side.  If you don’t , adjust to your particular taste.  The toasted bread crumbs are a nice touch as well.  They add that little textural crunch, without resorting to whole oil-ladened croutons.  Give this salad a try– you’ll like it.

The Recipe: Raw Tuscan Kale Salad

1 bunch Tuscan kale (also know as black, dinosaur, or lacinato)

1 slice whole wheat bread

1 clove garlic

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 cup finely grated parmesan cheese (grand padano or pecorino work well, too)

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 lemon (about 4 tablespoons)

Red pepper flakes, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

To make the breadcrumbs: Tear the piece of bread into small sections and place in a mini- food processor.  Pulse a few times until the mixture resembles small breadcrumbs.  Place the breadcrumbs into a small skillet on medium heat.  Stir frequently and toast them until they are crunchy, but not burnt, just a couple of minutes.  Remove them from the heat and set aside.

To make the dressing:  Using a chef’s knife, mince then mash the garlic glove and place into a medium-sized bowl.  Add the salt and mix it together until a paste forms.  Add the cheese, lemon juice, olive oil, cracked black pepper, and red pepper flakes.  Whisk to combine.  Taste.  Adjust seasonings, if necessary.

To make the salad:  Wash and remove the thick “stem” from the center of the kale leaves and discard.  Cut the kale into thin ribbons.  Place the kale in a large salad bowl and pour some of the dressing on it.  Mix well, as the dressing is thick.  I tend not to use the entire amount of dressing on my salad, though you may enjoy your salads more dressed than I do.  Let the salad sit for about 5 minutes (if you can wait, I usually can’t) and top with the whole wheat bread crumbs.  Enjoy!

Source: Adapted from Melissa Clark’s In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite

I hope the start to your week is a great one — thanks for stopping by!

Laurie

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Had enough heavy Holiday foods and sweets yet?  Me too.  I figure it’s time to get back to a few delicious everyday recipes.  Now that it’s just you, me, and Winter, we can make all sorts of great dishes for no good reason other than because we want to.  Today, it’s homemade pizza.  What’s more ‘everyday’ than that?  This is the perfect stay-at-home meal that’ll make you happy you didn’t head out into the wind and cold searching for a restaurant this weekend.  The base here is my go-to pizza crust (though, admittedly, I love this one by Zoe Francois as well).  This multi-flour pizza crust tastes amazing and it’s ridiculously easy to throw together.  It never fails me.

I know, I know– we’ve all made homemade pizza, so why should you try this recipe?  I guess three reasons come to mind.  First, the crust here combines three different flours.  They give the dough more depth, more heartiness.  While you may find it a bit more difficult to track down the rye flour, it’s worth making the effort.  And even if you can’t, add in more regular flour to ensure that the total amount is about 14 ounces.  This dough is easy to make ahead of time.  While it’s ready in just over an hour, if you want to let it sit in the refrigerator for a day or so, you’ll really notice that the flavors deepen.

Reason number two for following this recipe is the pizza stone.  Sure, it isn’t actually part of the recipe, but if you’ve been disappointed by your homemade efforts in the past, a decent pizza stone can make a huge difference.  Go buy one– now.  They vary in price and size, so pick one that fits your needs.  The stone is a must-have for a decent crust.  You’ll want the crust to begin baking on contact.  It adds that nice crunchiness that so many homemade efforts are missing.  I’ve experimented with this pizza crust recipe over the years, and finally found that using the heated stone– as well as rolling out the crust very thin— makes all the difference.  It is perfectly crispy, yet still substantial.

Reason number three is the ingredients.  Of course we all like different toppings, but if you haven’t tried ricotta cheese, olive oil, and fresh herbs on your pizza, you’re missing out.  Try it.  I insist.  Ricotta provides such a delightful creaminess, that nicely balances the salt so prevalent in other ingredients.  And olive oil and fresh herbs add a vibrancy that so many pizzas lack.  (Note, if you put herbs on your pizza, put those on after its baked to avoid burning them.)  If you’re curious, the pizza in the photographs contains olive oil, sliced garlic, roasted red pepper, spinach, ricotta cheese, grated mozzarella, parmesan, and red-pepper flakes.  Give it a try, or experiment for yourself.  Either way, have a wonderful pizza night this weekend with your family!

The Recipe: Homemade Pizza Dough

(Makes enough for 2 medium pizzas or several individuals)

1 teaspoon instant or rapid-rise yeast

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour  (note: the total weight of all the flours combined should be about 14 ounces)

3/4 cup whole wheat flour

1/4 cup rye flour

2 teaspoons kosher or sea salt

1  to  1 1/4 cups water heated to 100-110°F

2 tablespoons, plus 1 teaspoon olive oil

Making the Dough: Using a food processor fitted with the dough blade, add the flours, salt, and yeast (of course this can all be done by hand, if you don’t have a food processor). Pulse it a few times to combine.  Turn the machine on and add 1 cup water plus 2 tablespoons olive oil slowly into the feed tube.  Process for about 30 seconds and then slowly add the remaining 1/4 cup of water, a little bit at a time, until the mixture forms a dough ball and begins swirling around the processor. You may not need the entire 1/4 cup of water.  It should be slightly sticky to the touch.  If it’s too dry, add a bit more water.   Turn the dough onto a slightly floured work surface and knead by hand for a minute or so.  Place dough into a bowl greased with the remaining teaspoon of olive oil.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm, draft-free area until doubled in size, 1-2 hours.  At this point, you can use the dough immediately.  Or you can deepen the flavor and refrigerate it over night.  If you have the time, a slow-rise in the refrigerator for 6-8 hours is also an option.  You may also freeze the dough.  Defrost in a covered bowl in the refrigerator or at room temperature.  I’ve kept my dough in the refrigerator for several days and it just seems to deepen the flavor.

Getting ready to make the pizza:  Place your pizza stone on the middle rack in your oven.  Preheat the oven for as high as it will go, mine is 500°F, for 30 minutes before you place your pizza on the stone.   On a floured surface, roll your pizza dough out to your desired thickness (I suggest going very thin!).  Generously flour a pizza peel or the back of a large cookie sheet and place the rolled-out dough onto it.  Make sure you can move the dough around with ease, as it will need to slip off of the surface and onto the pizza stone very quickly.  Place your toppings onto the pizza.  Make sure to drizzle any olive oil onto the pizza after it is on the stone, if need be, or it will run everywhere during the transfer.  Open the oven and pull out the rack.  Gently and very confidently slip the pizza onto the stone.  Make sure to start at the end of the stone furtherest away from you.  Close the oven door and let bake until the cheese is a deep golden brown and done to your liking.  Check it often, it will take about 5- 7 minutes. However, every oven is different, so do not rely on this number too heavily.

Source: Adapted from Mark Bittman’s How To Cook Everything

So glad to stopped by Relishing It today!  I love having your company.

Laurie

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Here’s a little insight into what’s going on in my head– and I realize this is not normal– but the highlight of my week usually involves hitting the local farmers’ markets with my family.  Aria, my two-year-old daughter, loves it as much as I do.  We pretty much have to drag the home-body boys (Aanen and Radd), who protest all the way.  Well, maybe not all the way.  Once they’re out of the  house, I think they enjoy it, too.    

Anyway, late Summer is when the market really shines– so many different varieties of produce to choose from!  Last weekend I snagged these gorgeous purple potatoes.  Look at how vibrant they are!  This is nature.  This is food.  And it still amazes me.  Despite what some sources say– and I know it’s probably just in my head– I feel like purple potatoes have a more earthy flavor that a plain-old white ones.  If not, well then they’re just more interesting.

This potato salad keeps it simple, yet looks fantastic.  The point is to let the beautiful colors and fresh flavors be the center of attraction, rather than cover everything up with a glop of mayo.  The addition of the herbs (especially the mint, do NOT omit the mint!) make this salad taste like Summer.  The subtle flavor of creme fraiche lets the produce shine, yet adds that creaminess you expect in a potato salad.  The radishes give a contrasting delightful crunch.  If you don’t have creme fraiche, you can use sour cream, but you’ll notice a bit more of a tang.  I love to finish this salad with a drizzle of olive oil and a squeeze of lemon juice.  It just works and it’s one of my favorite potato salads.

The Recipe:  Creme Fraiche, Herb, and Purple Potato Salad

1 – 1 1/2 pounds new purple potatoes

handful of parsley, mint, and basil chopped (around 3/4 cup total)

5-6 green onions, chopped

6  large radishes, chopped

1/2  lemon

1/3 – 1/2 cup creme fraiche

3-4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

kosher salt and cracked blacked pepper, to taste

To steam the potatoes:  I prefer steaming to boiling– the potatoes retain less water this way.  Put potatoes in a steamer basket placed in a saucepan with a tight lid.  Make sure to put enough water into it.  Steam potatoes until nearly done, then turn off heat and let them sit for 10 more minutes.  The potatoes will continue to cook with the heat turned off.  The cooking time will vary based upon the size of your potatoes, so be sure to check it.  I steamed mine for 25 minutes, and let them sit for another 10 minutes.  Yours may take less time.  Just be sure to check them by inserting a sharp knife into them.  Be sure your saucepan doesn’t run out of water.

Sprinkle potatoes with a bit of salt and let them cool.  Meanwhile, chop the herbs, radishes,  and green onions.  Add them to the cooled potatoes, along with the creme fraiche, olive oil, and a squeeze of the lemon juice.  Don’t squeeze the full amount right away.  Taste as you go along, and definitely feel free to adjust measurements to your liking.  You may want a bit more creme fraiche and olive oil.   Be sure to season with salt appropriately, as the salt really brings all of these flavors together.    Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It today.  Have a great weekend!

Laurie

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Hello everyone!   Summer finally arrived in the Upper Midwest, and boy, did it show up with a vengeance!  Those living nearby probably don’t want to hear more about just how miserable the weather is, but for those of you in distant lands, the heat index has been flirting with 120 degrees here all week.  I’m seriously starting to look forward to a nice winter snow storm…which will probably be only a few months away.  Ahhh… Minnesota.

So where have I been, you ask?  Well, we’ve had a busy July.  As you know, I took the kids to North Dakota to visit family.  We had such a great time seeing everyone.   Shortly after we got back, we took our first trip to the world-famous Wisconsin Dells.  It was so much fun, and so cheesy (Wisconsin pun intended).  Waterslides, go-cart racing, food, a tour down the river on some sort of World War II vehicle.  Our kids are still talking about the trip.  They want to go back right away.

Now that you’ve had the family update, let’s talk food again.  Wow!  Do I have some exciting things to share with you!  Let’s start today with this gorgeous heirloom tomato galette.  You know I love fresh tomatoes, but are you aware that I’m that slightly-crazy person who refuses to buy one all winter long?  More than any other vegetable (cucumbers are a close second), tomatoes purchased out of season and shipped in simply do not taste the same.  Not even close.  Thankfully, they’re  in-season now, so you can expect to see several more tomato-based dishes in the coming weeks.

This show-stopper of a tart is the perfect way to feature the pure flavor of ripe tomatoes.  I’ve been waiting to make this recipe for awhile– not only because it looks incredible– but because it’s the creation of chef/owner Naomi Pomeroy from the fabulous restaurant Beast in Portland, OR.  Last October, Radd and I vacationed in the Pacific Northwest and stumbled into Beast– a communal-style locavore paradise.  We shared a table and company with six strangers.  The food was divine, and it was easily one of the best dining experiences I’ve ever had.  When I saw that this tart came from Beast, I knew I had to make it.

So how is it?  Better than you can imagine.  When I showed Radd, he thought it looked great, but he wasn’t exactly fired-up to try it.  After his third piece, he said it was one of the best things he’s eaten in a long, long time.  The crust is so delicate and flakey.  The manchego cheese adds a creaminess that perfectly compliments the acidity of the tomatoes.  Finally, the olive oil and herbs provide subtle complexity– the flavor really goes on and on.  It’s delicious warm, but even better at room temperature.  If you make only one savory dish from my blog over the next couple of weeks, it should be this one.  It’s that good.

The Recipe:  Heirloom Tomato Tart

Makes one 12-inch tart

Serves 4 to 6

For the Galette

1 cup all-purpose flour; plus more for work surface

1/2 teaspoon course salt; plus more for tomatoes

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or rosemary for the dough, plus more for on top of the galette

1 stick (8 tablespoons), unsalted butter, chilled and cut into 1/2 – inch pieces

1/2 cup sour cream (full fat), chilled

1 pint tomatoes  (a combination of heirloom cherry tomatoes and other tomatoes, cut in half or sliced if large)

1/3 pound manchego cheese, or other semi-hard sheep’s milk cheese

1 egg white,  for an egg wash

For the Garnish (Optional)

1 bunch microgreens (arugala microgreens worked well)

Extra-virgin olive oil

Red-wine vinegar

Coarse salt

To make the dough: Combine the flour, salt, baking powder,  and 1 teaspoon of minced herbs in a food processor and pulse a few times to mix.  Then add the butter and pulse until the butter is just incorporated into the dry ingredients, making sure not to over-mix.  Some of the butter may be the size of a pea, which is fine.  This can also be done by hand if you don’t have a food processor.  Mix in the sour cream, being careful, once again, not to over-mix.  Turn the entire mixture out onto a cutting board and gently push it together into a ball.  Wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours.

To make the filling: Put the tomatoes in a colander and sprinkle generously with coarse salt.  Lay the tomatoes on several sheets of paper towel to drain (dried tomatoes will make a crisp tart).

In the meantime: Heat the oven to 425°F.  Lay out a sheet of parchment paper that will fit onto your baking sheet.  Dust it with flour, as well as your rolling pin, and roll the dough out to a 12-inch circle about 1/8 – inch thick.   Leaving a  3 -inch border, scatter the cheese on the top of the dough, then arrange the tomatoes evenly over the cheese.  Sprinkle with a bit more thyme and rosemary.  Fold the edges of the dough over the tomatoes, making pleats as you fold and leaving the center of the tart open.  Make sure there are no holes in the dough; pinch the dough together if one appears.  Whisk the egg white and apply to the tart dough with a pastry brush or paper towel.  Transfer the tart with parchment paper still underneath to a baking sheet.

Bake the galette until golden brown, 30 -40 minutes.  Let cool on rack.

While the galette cools, lightly dress the microgreens with the olive oil, vinegar and salt.  Drizzle the top of the galette with olive oil and sprinkle it with course salt.  Slice the galette and serve with microgreens, of desired.    Enjoy!

Source:  Adapted from Harvest to Heat Cookbook via Naomi Pomeroy from Beast in Portland, OR

Thanks for visiting Relishing It today!  Hope you are all enjoying your summer.  See you soon.

Laurie

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For this post I decided to make crostini from start-to-finish… not just a variety of toppings, but the whole bread-baking process.  Yes, it’s easier to simply find a wonderful crusty bread from a nearby bakery (and I often do this), but there’s something therapeutic about baking bread.  While it takes more patience and planning, in the end I found it to be so much more satisfying.  The smell of fresh bread throughout my house alone convinced me to do this more often.  Just look at this loaf!

The bread I chose for this appetizer is crusty on the outside, but has a soft-yet-firm interior.  It keeps well, which means you can bake it long ahead of time if you’re hosting a party and need to get other things prepared.  To turn it into crostini, I grilled the bread and added two fresh, colorful, and oh-so-tasty toppings.  For the first, I was so happy to be able to use garlic, basil, and a batch of the first tomatoes of the season from our farmers’ market.  This is the first fresh-tomato post of the Summer– it will not be the last.

For the second, I threw together a simple herbed-ricotta topping with thinly-sliced radishes.  I love ricotta cheese, and unabashedly admit that I often scoop and eat spoonfuls while standing in front of the open-door refrigerator.  If you can find one locally, buy it.  Mixing in the fresh herbs gives it a nice flavor-burst.

The Recipe:  An Honest Loaf

1 tablespoon active dry yeast

2 cups lukewarm water (110-115°F)

2 cups unbleached bread flour

1/2  cup whole wheat flour

1/2  cup semolina, plus extra for dusting

2 teaspoons salt

Put the yeast and water into a large mixing bowl.  Stir in 1 cup of the bread flour to make a batter.  The mixture will begin to bubble, letting you know that the yeast is working.  Let the mixture sit at room temperature for about an hour, until it is frothy and has risen in the bowl.

Add the white flour, whole wheat flour, semolina, and salt to the starter and stir well.  When the dough is gathered, but still shaggy, turn it out onto a floured counter and knead it for a couple of minutes, dusting with flour if necessary; the dough should remain somewhat sticky.

Put the dough in a mixing bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate overnight.  The dough will rise a bit in the bowl.

The next day, remove the dough from the bowl and punch it down to get the air out.  Knead the dough again for a few minutes, and form it into a smooth ball.

Select a linen-lined basket or low, wide bowl large enough to contain the dough when it doubles in size.  Place a linen napkin in a bowl, if that’s what you’re using.  I used a regular flour-sack towel and my bamboo salad bowl and that worked just fine.  Make sure to dust linen or napkin heavily with white flour before you add the dough.  Set the dough ball in the basket or bowl, dust the top with semolina, and cover loosely with plastic wrap.  Let the dough rise at a cool room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, or until doubled in size.  The longer and cooler the rise, the better the texture of the bread will be.

Preheat oven to 450°F – make sure it’s thoroughly preheated!  I am a true believer in a oven thermometer.  If you don’t have one — pick one up.  They’re cheap.  Sprinkle baking sheet with semolina.  Ease the dough onto the baking sheet by carefully inverting the basket or bowl over the sheet.  This part was tricky.  Remove the basket or napkin.  The top of the dough will have a light coating of flour.  Sprinkle on a bit more.

With a sharp, thin knife or razor blade, quickly slash a large  “X” in the middle of the dough, about 1/2 – inch deep.  Immediately put the pan into the hot oven and bake for 15 minutes.  The loaf will puff dramatically and the crust will have begun to form.

Turn down the oven to 400°F and bake for 45 minutes more, or until the bread is dark and crusty.  Remove the bread from the oven and put onto a cooling rack.  Wait until the bread has cooled completely before cutting.  In fact, this bread gets better the longer you wait to cut into it, unlike a baguette.  It will be even better the following day.

Source:  Adapted from David Tanis’ Heart of the Artichoke and Other Kitchen Journeys

The Recipe: Crostini with Tomatoes, Garlic, and Basil & Fresh Mozzarella  and  Herbed Ricotta with Radishes

 

Tomatoes, Garlic, and Basil Topping:

2 large farmer’s market tomatoes, diced

3-4 cloves minced garlic

7-8  fresh basil leaves, chopped

1 “glug” of red wine vinegar (about 1 tablespoon)

1 “glug” of good extra-virgin olive oil (about 1 tablespoon)

sprinkle of red pepper flakes (as much as you can handle)

kosher salt to taste  (make sure you don’t under-salt this — salt really brings out the flavor of tomatoes)

Mix all of the ingredients in a bowl.  Let sit  at room temperature for a 1/2 hour or so. The flavors will combine wonderfully.  Re-season, if necessary.

 

Herbed Ricotta

1 cup fresh ricotta cheese (buy some that is made locally, if possible.  The flavor is usually superior)

3 cloves of garlic, minced

2 scallions, finely chopped

Handful of mixed herbs, finely chopped — I used, mint, basil, chervil, parsley, chives and dill.  Use whatever you happen to have.  You should end up with about 1/2 cup finely chopped herbs.

Kosher salt and cracked black pepper, to taste.

Mix all of the ingredients together in a bowl and let sit for about 20 minutes.  Add more salt and pepper, if necessary.

Pre-heat the grill.  Slice the loaf of bread.  Brush with olive oil on each side  and top with a sprinkle of salt.  Grill for just a few minutes on each side, until you get the color you like.  Top with a slice of fresh mozzarella and the tomato, garlic, and basil topping.  The bread will soak up the juice wonderfully.  Top another piece of crostini with the herbed ricotta and a few thinly sliced radishes.  Enjoy with a lovely cocktail, of course!

Thanks again for stopping by Relishing It today!  As always, I enjoy reading  your comments.  Let me know if you’ve been busy in the kitchen with any of these recipes.  Have a great weekend.

Laurie

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