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Archive for November, 2013

Sour Cream Apple Pie | Relishing It

I thought I’d share my husband’s all-time favorite pie with you today.  It’s an interesting twist on the typical apple pie, and it would make a great Thanksgiving-day dessert.  I’ll explain the pie in a minute, but first I want to take a moment to talk about my husband– because that’s way more fun.

Sour Cream Apple Pie | Relishing It

Radd.  Yep, that’s his real, full, first name.  The one his parents made-up and named him, though according to family lore, it was mostly his mom’s choice.  I think it’s one of the best names I’ve ever heard.  And I’ve never heard anyone else with it– it’s unique, which suits him.  Radd and I started dating in high school, a looong time ago.  He had this gangly teenage-boy body that looked too small for his large head, while I was sporting huge early 90’s hair to go with my rolled jeans, and a mouth full of braces.  We really were just kids.  We ventured off to college together and he became my home, so to speak.  You know that feeling– that wherever you are together is home and quite possibly the most comfortable place in the world.  Yes, that feeling.  Why am I writing about this now?  Well, we recently celebrated Radd’s 40th birthday.  And while I was excited to celebrate this milestone with him, I was also taken aback.  I had a hard time wrapping my head around the fact that this boy I’ve been with for 23 years is now a middle-aged man.  Where did the time go?  At any rate, I adore him.  He’s intelligent, hilarious, bizarre (in a great way), and an incredible dad.  Not to mention, he understands me– I mean really gets me.  Which is probably the most important thing of all.

Sour Cream Apple Pie | Relishing It

Now to the pie that I made Radd for his birthday.  This Sour Cream Apple pie is his favorite.  Full Stop.  The recipe comes from my Mom– she made it for him once many years ago and he’s loved it ever since.  It’s a delicious apple crumble-like pie with a lovely slightly tart sour cream custard-like filling.  There are notes of nutmeg (which is one of my favorite spices) and cinnamon.  Taken as a whole, it’s pretty amazing.  This pie is perfect for Thanksgiving, or any type of entertaining, because it actually gets better if it’s left in the refrigerator for a day.  The custard has time to set up and the flavors seem to meld even more after a bit of time.  Though, I know that some of you prefer a warm apple pie, so feel free to bake it at the last minute.  Whichever you prefer, I’m sure you’ll enjoy it.

Need more great Holiday dessert ideas?  This Brown Butter Pumpkin Layer Cake  and this Bourbon-Chocolate Pecan Pie remain some of my all-time favorites.

Sour Cream Apple Pie | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Sour Cream and Apple Pie

Use 1/2 of this all-butter pie crust recipe

1 cup full-fat sour cream

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg (I like mine to have a definite nutmeg taste so I use 1/2 teaspoon)

2 cups diced apples ( about 4 apples)

For the Crumble Topping:

1/3 cup granulated sugar

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 cup cold unsalted butter, diced

Follow the recipe and instructions from this recipe to prepare the pie dough.  Either make the entire recipe for the dough, and save half for later.  Or simply make only half of the recipe.  You decide.

Pre-heat your oven to 400°F.

To make the Crumble Topping:  In a small bowl, stir the dry ingredients together with a fork.  Then, using that fork, cut the butter into the mixture until it’s crumbly and all of the dry ingredients are incorporated into the butter.  Store in the refrigerator until ready to use.

To make the Pie Filling, beat together the first seven ingredients in a medium-sized bowl until smooth.  Gently stir in the apples.  Set aside.

Shape the pie dough in a 9-inch pie plate.  Pour the apple/sour cream filling into the pie.  Bake for 15 minutes.  Then reduce heat to 350°F for 30 minutes.  Remove pie from oven and add the crumble mixture to the top of the pie.  Return to oven and increase the heat to 400°F and bake for another 10 minutes.  Remove from the oven and let cool completely on a cooling rack.  Cover and place in the refrigerator if wanting to serve it cold.  Enjoy!

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Thanks for stopping by today!

Laurie

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Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, and Black Rice | Relishing ItI just know many of you are in the thick of planning your Thanksgiving menus, and I’ve got a side dish that would look absolutely grand on your table.  I’m one of those who think the Thanksgiving meal is all about the sides.  Sure, the turkey is fine, but there just isn’t a lot of excitement there.  It’s the side dishes that have the variety of flavors and colors that make the meal so interesting.   At least that’s how I feel.  My husband habitually defaults to two servings of turkey, gravy, potatoes, and stuffing.  That’s it.  I’m not sure what’s wrong with him.  Anyway, even if you’re not looking for a Thanksgiving idea, this dish is pretty incredible for any occasion.  I like to make it and enjoy the leftovers throughout the week– it keeps and heats up beautifully, never losing any texture or flavor.

Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, and Black Rice | Relishing It

Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, and Black Rice | Relishing It

Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, and Black Rice | Relishing It

Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, and Black Rice | Relishing It

I usually have some baked squash in my refrigerator on most any day during winter.  It’s just one of those healthy, filling vegetables that works with so many meals.  Butternut squash holds it’s shape really well in this dish.  Brussels are also a favorite, and here they go particularly well with the squash.  If you haven’t yet tried black rice, here’s your chance.  It’s healthy and has a wonderfully nutty flavor.  The slightly-chewy, toothsome texture balances out the softer vegetables in this dish.  And if you can’t get your hands on black rice, any wild rice would be a good substitute.

Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, and Black Rice | Relishing It

Finally, let’s talk about this amazing ginger sesame dressing.  Ginger adds such a unique and robust flavor, so a little goes a long way.  The sesame oil give the dressing an additional layer of nuttiness (flavor, not craziness).  It’s worth buying a bottle.  Side note, keep it in your refrigerator, so it lasts longer.  This dressing is amazing on these vegetables– but would be wonderful on so many other things, as well.  Be creative!  Enjoy!

Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, and Black Rice | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Ginger Sesame Butternut Squash, Brussel Sprouts, & Black Rice

(makes enough for 4-6 people, easily)

About 1 pound small brussel sprouts, halved (or quartered, if large)

About 1 pound (or a bit more) butternut squash, peeled and cubed

2/3 cup dry black rice, rinsed

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, for roasting

1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted, for garnish

Ginger Sesame Dressing:

3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon finely minced ginger

1 garlic clove, minced

1 teaspoon honey

1/2 teaspoon soy sauce

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

Preheat oven to 375°F.

To make the black rice:  Place the rinsed rice in a medium saucepan along with 1 1/3 cups of water.  Add a sprinkle of salt.  Cover and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to low-medium  and cook for about 20 minutes, or until the rice is mostly tender.  Turn off the heat and let it sit in the pan covered for 15 minutes, or so .  Fluff with a fork when ready to use.

Meanwhile, place the brussel sprouts and butternut squash on a large baking sheet.  Toss with two tablespoons of olive oil.  Roast for abut 25-30 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender.  Make sure to flip the vegetables once or twice for even browning.

To make the Ginger Sesame Dressing:  In a medium-sizd bowl, whisk together all of the ingredients except the olive oil.  Then, slowly add the olive oil while continuing to whisk.  Set aside until ready to use.

In a large serving bowl or platter, gently combine the roasted butternut squash, brussel sprouts, black rice, and ginger sesame dressing.  Taste and season with kosher salt, if necessary.  Top with the toasted sesame seeds.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by today!

Laurie

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Spiced Ginger Cookies | Relishing It

About once or twice every holiday season, I find myself craving a good ginger cookie.  They taste like Fall, perfectly distilled into a little round treat.  The warm, earthy spices, the bits of heat from the ginger, along with the unique flavor from the molasses are magical.  And since I only eat ginger cookies once or twice a year, I want them to be fantastic– really something special.  This, friends, is that class of ginger cookie.

Spiced Ginger Cookies | Relishing It

Spiced Ginger Cookies | Relishing It

A couple years ago, my friend made these cookies and they blew me away.  The little bits of candied ginger really stood out.  She pointed me to the recipe and I’ve been making them ever since– with my own tweaks, of course.   I actually thought about crafting my own recipe this year, but then realized that there was really not a point.  This is the ginger cookie that I want.  It’s perfectly crisp on the outside, wonderfully chewy on the inside.  It’s spice combination is perfect, and there is  just enough molasses to bring it all together without being overpowering.  I love this ginger cookie.  And it’s even better rolled in  demerara or turbinado  sugar.  The extra crunch from the large granules is key.  Also, try it with a light sprinkle of sea salt on the very top.  Amazing.  And there’s an added bonus– these keep a bit longer than an average cookie, so making them ahead for gift-giving or cookie exchanges is a great option.  I hope you enjoy these cookies this holiday season!

Spiced Ginger Cookies | Relishing It

The Recipe: Spiced Ginger Cookies

(makes about 30)

2 cups white whole wheat flour

2 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon ground cloves

1 teaspoon kosher salt

3/4 cup crystallized ginger, chopped finely

1 cup packed brown sugar

3/4 cup unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks)

1 large egg (at room temperature)

1/4 cup mild-flavored molasses

Some sort of raw sugar for rolling, Turbinado or Demerara work well

Whisk together the flour, ground ginger, baking soda, cinnamon, ground cloves, and salt in a medium-sized bowl.  Next, sift them together.  This will get rid of any lumps that ground spices sometimes form.  Stir in the crystallized ginger.  Set aside.

In a bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or by hand), cream the butter and brown sugar together for about 3 minutes on medium speed or until light and fluffy.  Next, add the egg and molasses to the mixture and continue to mix on medium speed for another 2-3 minutes.  It is integral in any cookie recipe to cream the butter,sugar, and egg together long enough.

Add the dry ingredients to the bowl and mix until just fully incorporated.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Meanwhile, preheat your oven to 350°F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.  When the dough is chilled, roll it out into balls  ( I used a 1 1/2 tablespoon scoop) and roll them into the raw sugar.  Press down slightly ( but not too much) to flatten them a bit– or else they’ll end up being fairly puffy cookies.  Bake for 12 minutes.  Remove from oven and let cool for 2 minutes on the pan, then move to a cooling rack.  They keep  well for days in an airtight container.  Enjoy!

Source:  Adapted from Bon Appetit Magazine

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!  Have a great weekend.

Laurie

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Vegetarian Lentil Taco Soup | Relishing ItBaby, it’s cold outside!  Or at least it is here in Minnesota.  There is definitely that ‘winter-is-coming’ chill in the air.  And this is just the start.  Wind chills will eventually plummet to -50 degrees F, snow will pile up on the sidewalks.  Ugh.  I always complain as autumn comes to a close, knowing that we face the long slog to April.  My body just isn’t acclimated to the cold for the first month or so.  Ah well, I guess there’s also the comforting expectation of snuggling into a warm blanket and a good book while the kids head out to play in the snow.  There is that to look forward to…

Homemade Taco Seasoning | Relishing It

Homemade Taco Seasoning | Relishing It

Vegetarian Lenti; Taco Soup | Relishing It

As soon as the weather turns, I start thinking about soup.  This particular one is a beauty.  It’s substantial– more like a cross between a soup and a stew.  It’s loaded with healthy protein from lentils and beans, though my favorite ingredient this time around is most definitely the corn.  It makes so many soups better.  It adds a nice flavor and a bit of texture, as well.  Not to mention, it pairs beautifully with the Mexican flavors.

Vegetarian Lentil Taco Soup | Relishing It

Let’s talk about those flavors, shall we?  Years ago I began making my own taco mix.  To be honest, it happened a bit by accident.  I ran out of my usual purchased taco seasoning, so I had to improvise.  Luckily, I keep a well stocked spice cabinet (Penzys really should send me a thank you note).  In looking at the recipe, don’t let the length of the list scare you.  I realize that not everyone has all of the spices on hand.  As long as you have the main ones (chili, paprika, garlic, onion, and cumin powder), you will be just fine.  But, if you do happen to have the others, even better.  Try this seasoning the next time you make traditional tacos– you’ll love it!

Vegetarian Lentil Taco Soup | Relishing ItThe soup is wonderful served with the usual taco accompaniments– sour cream, cilantro, jalapeños, and of course some tortilla chips. However, I also discovered another way that I like to eat the leftovers.  Since the legumes continue to soak up more broth overnight, the soup becomes a bit thicker.  I love to serve it atop baked spaghetti squash.  It’s delicious and makes a great gluten-free, paleo, and even vegan meal! So– perfect to serve to friends or family that might be trying to eat that particular way.  Stay warm, friends!

Vegetarian Lentil Taco Soup Over Spaghetti Squash | Relishing It

The Recipe: Vegetarian Lentil Taco Soup

(serves 4-6 comfortably)

2 cups dry brown lentils, rinsed

2/3 cup dry red beans (or 1 can), rinsed

2/3 cup dry black beans (or 1 can), rinsed

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 cup chopped white onion

3 garlic cloves, minced

1 quart puréed or crushed tomatoes

1 quart vegetable broth (or use chicken, if you’re not trying to stay vegetarian)

1 heaping cup frozen corn

1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

juice of one lime

scallions, jalapeños, sour cream (if vegan isn’t your aim) and limes as garnish options

For the Taco Seasoning:

(makes a scant 1/2 cup)

2 tablespoons ancho chili powder

1 tablespoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon sweet paprika

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon onion powder

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 teaspoons coarse black pepper

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

To begin: soak and cook your red and black beans separately following standard directions to cook beans.  Honestly, I usually have extras in my freezer that I pull out to throw into this soup.  Beans freeze incredibly well, so feel free to make extras for that purpose. You’ll want about 1 1/2 cups of cooked red beans, and 1 1/2 cups of cooked black beans.  Or simple choose to use one can of each, rinsed.

Mix all of the taco seasoning ingredients together in small bowl, set aside.

Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat and add the olive oil.   Begin to saute the onion and garlic for a couple of minutes until somewhat soft.  Add the taco seasoning to the onion mixture.  Then add the tomatoes, vegetables stock, cooked red and black beans, and the lentils.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a medium simmer.  Cook covered for about 30-40 minutes, or until the lentils are tender, but have not fallen apart.  Stirring a couple of times along the way.  Make sure not to overcook the lentils, or they will turn to mush.  When the soup is done, add the frozen corn, cilantro, and juice of one lime.  Reseason with salt and pepper, if necessary.  Serve with sour cream, cilantro, jalapeños, and more lime.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

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Easy Homemade Sauerkraut | Relishing It

I grew up in a small town in western North Dakota settled way-back-when mostly by German immigrants. Not surprisingly, sauerkraut has always been a part of my family’s meals. My grandmothers, aunts, and my mom have always made their own.  I can’t tell you how many times in my childhood I had to trudge down the stairs to the cool basement to retreive another jar of kraut from the shelves packed with canned goods. It was always there– an endless supply. I loved sauerkraut as a kid, and still do. I’m that person who orders it on pizza any chance I get.  My favorite way to eat it is simply really cold, in a bowl.  I like my sauerkraut to have a lot of crunch to it.

Easy Homemade Sauerkraut | Relishing It

I don’t exactly make my sauerkraut the same way the rest of my family does.  My version tastes the same– I’ve nailed down the technique that gives that deliciously tangy and crunchy sauerkraut.  But, I don’t can my batches. There are so many good, healthy things happening when you ferment food, that I just can’t bring myself to ruin those benefits by heating it up too much. Instead, I make small batches and let it ferment for a few weeks at room temperature, and then refrigerate.  If you’re not familiar with fermentation and the health benefits, be sure to look into it.

Easy Homemade Sauerkraut | Relishing It

I’ve made saurkraut in a traditional crock in th past, which though seemingly fun, didn’t give me the results I was looking for. I loved the idea of the crock sitting out and fermenting for all to smell and see, but there was no crunch when it was all said and done. I’ll find another use for that crock, though.

Easy Homemade Sauerkraut | Relishing It

Easy Homemade Sauerkraut | Relishing It

I’ve found that my sauerkraut turns out precisely how I want it when I pack it into mason jars and let it ferment on the counter for a couple of weeks.  It becomes deliciously tangy and stays crisp and crunchy.  Every few days in the beginning of the fermentation process, I’ll open the jar to release some of the gas.  It doesn’t take long for the cabbage to take on that tell-tale sauerkraut scent.  The first time or two that you do this, there will be quite a lot of bubbles and fizzing action.  Exciting! After about 2-3 weeks of sitting out at room temperature, I test it out and when it’s the perfect tanginess– I put it in the refrigerator, ready to eat. Then I start another batch, and the process just rolls along. I always have fresh sauerkraut to use in my favorite dishes, such as this Rustic Potato, Sauerkraut, and Beef Galette.  Or mix it into this beautiful Ham, Bean, and Sauerkraut Soup by Fresh Tart.   I hope you give this a try.  It’s ridiculously easy and the rewards are fantastic.

Easy Homemade Sauerkraut | Relishing It

The Recipe:  Easy Homemade Sauerkraut

(makes about 2 quarts)

5 pounds of fresh cabbage, cored and sliced into ribbons (not too thick, not too thin).  Reserve a couple of the large outer leaves to use later.

3 tablespoons kosher or sea salt  (nothing with chemicals, please)

2 sterilized mason jars with lids  (preferably regular mouth jars– the “shoulders” on the sides will keep the cabbage pressed down and submerged in the liquid better)

I’ve  found that if I slice my cabbage too thin, it doesn’t have the crunch that I’m looking for.  Too thick, and it’s awkward to chew.  Using a chef’s knife works the best for me.  Slice it into not-too-thin, but not-too-thick ribbons (use your best judgement and refer to the photos).

Place the sliced cabbage in a huge bowl and sprinkle with salt.  Use a masher, if you have one,  to mix the salt and cabbage together.  Bruising the cabbage a bit with the masher with soften the cabbage up and release some of the water from it.  Inevitably, I turn to my hands and massage the cabbage and salt together.  Let it sit for about an hour, or so.   Keep massaging it a couple of times throughout that hour, or place a plate directly on top of the cabbage and something heavy on the plate to weigh it down.  The pressure will release the water faster.  There should be a pool of liquid that has formed.  Pack it into the mason jars and push down– the liquid should come above the cabbage.  Next, fold the extra cabbage leaf and place on top of the cabbage.  This will push your cabbage down so it remains in the liquid to ferment.  Put the cover on the jar and wait.  After a day or two, open the jar and let the gas out.  There will be a lot of bubbles and fizzing action.  This is good!  It’s beginning to ferment.  Check it again every couple of days.  Occasionally, mold may form on top of the cabbage.  This is fine and normal.   Just scoop it out and continue to ferment.  I’ve found that mold occurs more often when using the crock method, as opposed to mason jars.

 After about 2-3 weeks (depending upon how tangy you like your sauerkraut), remove the cabbage leaf and place the jar in the refrigerator to use.  I’m not exactly sure how long it will last in the refrigerator, as we always use ours before it’s even a question.  It should be fine for a few weeks, possibly a couple months.  Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by Relishing It!

Laurie

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Roasted Potatoes with a Curry Dipping Sauce | Relishing It

Sometimes you make mistakes.  Sometimes, you have to admit when you’ve simply been wrong.  Now don’t get too excited– this isn’t some juicy confession.  I’m talking about my misguided idea that potatoes should be avoided.  That they aren’t “good for you.”  I ate them sparingly for years, but then it occured to me, they’re a whole food.  Nature makes them all on it’s own.  Come on!  They’re potatoes.  Why did I think this was a bad thing?  Yes, they’re a carbohydrate, but I’m cool with that.  I need carbs in this body.  They give me energy.  I know I shouldn’t go crazy and pile starches onto my plate every meal, but, the same can be said about almost every food.  Well, maybe not broccoli…or kale…but you get the point.

Roasted Potatoes with a Curry Dipping Sauce | Relishing It

I’m glad I’ve rediscovered my love of potatoes.  I’ve probably mentioned here in the past that my Mom has always had an amazing garden.  When I was a little girl, we lived on a farm where there was plenty of space for her to grow almost anything.  Even so, rather than restrict them to the garden, the potatoes had a special HUGE section in a field near the house.  My grandparents would come over and we’d have potato-planting parties out in that field.  True story.  My favorite part was when, after a few months, we’d all head back out to the field and dig ’em up.  I can still see my Dad, with the salt shaker that he’d bring out into the field (seriously), shining up a few potatoes to crunch-away on while we dug.

Crispy roasted potatoes are amazing.  Here I’ve paired them with a delicious coconut curry dipping sauce.  The most important thing to keep in mind when making roasted potatoes is that you simply can’t cut them up and put them in the oven.  You need to cook them a fair amount beforehand.  Some people choose to boil them slightly, I always steam my potatoes.  I find that they don’t get saturated and fall apart this way.  It also keeps them from losing some of their nutrients.  For convenience, you can steam up a big batch of potatoes in the beginning of the week and leave them sit in your fridge– that way they’re ready to use whenever you need them.  You’d be surprised how many ways you can find to use them.

Roasted Potatoes with a Curry Dipping Sauce | Relishing It

The curry sauce here is delicious.  It’s simple and not overly fancy.  You should have most of these ingredients on hand already.  With the crispy potatoes, it makes a brilliant combination.  I hope you give these a try!

The Recipe:  Roasted Potatoes with a Coconut Curry Dipping Sauce

(serves 4)

1 pound small, yellow potatoes

1/3 cup finely chopped white onion

3 garlic cloves, finely minced

1 teaspoon finely minced fresh ginger

1 1/2 tablespoons sweet curry powder (I love Penzys’ version)

1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric

1/4 teaspoon garam masala

pinch of sugar, to taste

1 1/2 cups chicken broth, (1 tablespoon reserved)

1 teaspoon tomato paste

1/2 cup coconut milk

1 tablespoon cornstarch

salt and pepper

fresh cilantro for serving

In a large sauce pan, place a steamer basket (or you can choose to simply boil them) and fill with the potatoes and a bit of water.  Cover with a tight fitting lid and steam until the potatoes are tender when tested.  I steam my small potatoes whole, but if you only have large ones– just cut them up before steaming.  Make sure to not over-steam them, as they will fall apart.  I’m not going to give an exact time, as it will depend upon the size of your potato.  It’s best to just test them.  When they feel as if they’re nearly done.  Remove from heat and let them sit covered for a few minutes to finish cooking and then let cool.  At this point you can either put them in the refrigerator to use at a later time, or continue with the recipe.

Preheat the oven to 450°F.  Quarter the potatoes and place on a large baking sheet that has been coated with a thin layer of olive oil.  Drizzle a bit more olive oil on top of them and toss.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Keep in mind that potatoes tend to need a lot of salt.  Don’t be too shy.  Roast for about 15 minutes, then carefully flip the potatoes.  Yes, I do this individually, because I really enjoy crispy potatoes and I want all the sides to be properly golden browned.   It doesn’t take that long.  Roast for another 15 minutes.  Give another toss and test them.  Roast longer if necessary (again, much will depend upon how big your potatoes were cut).  Mine are usually done after 30 minutes.  Taste.  re-season, if necessary.

While your potatoes are roasting, begin the curry.  In a medium-sized skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil.  Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and sauté for a couple of minutes until somewhat tender.  Add the curry powder, turmeric, and garam masala and toast for abut 30 seconds.  Add the chicken broth (sans 1 tablespoon), tomato paste and coconut milk and a pinch of sugar.  Whisk together until smooth.  Cook over medium heat for about 10-15 minutes,  stirring frequently.  Taste as you go, add more salt or sugar, if necessary.  In a small bowl, mix 1 tablespoon cornstarch with 1 tablespoon chicken broth until it’s smooth.  Whisk mixture into the skillet and cook for about another 10 minutes until the mixture is somewhat thickened.  Reseason, if necessary.

Immediately sprinkle chopped cilantro on the hot, crispy potatoes when removed from the oven and serve along side the curry sauce.  The potatoes are best eaten immediately.  Enjoy!

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Last week was a busy one.  Along with the excitement of Halloween and indulging in far too much candy, our precious girl turned five!  You add so much happiness and joy to our lives, Aria.  We love you so much– Happy birthday!

Thanks for stopping by!

Laurie

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